Morris' of Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England
Synopsis: Morris' of Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England

Stratford-Upon-Avon District, Co Warwickshire Group Index
   
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John appears in Alveston with the baptism of his eldest known child, William, in 1632. The Alveston parish registers date back to the mid 1500s, however there are no references to the surname prior to 1632, indicating that John was not native to Alveston. Unfortunately there are no baptisms for a John Morris around the right time within a reasonable distance from Alveston. The nearest is a baptism at Wooten Warren, about 15km north-west of Alveston. John's baptism (and first marriage) is more likely to have been in an unindexed parish. With the death of Ruth Morris in 1748 the family vanishes from the Alveston records.


1. John Morris,[95] probably born between 1600-1610 (from DOB of issue). Married unknown. Married 2nd Alice Wheeler, 25/5/1641, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]

Children of John Morris:

i.
 
William Morrise, baptised 13/1/1632, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95] Married Jone Cape, 26/9/1667, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
Children: (a)
 
John Morrice, baptised 19/7/1668, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95] Married Ruth Gold, 11/2/1702, St Nicholas, Warwick, Co Warwickshire, England.[5] Ruth died 1748 & buried 13/6/1748, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
Children: (1)
 
William Morris, baptised 18/8/1706, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
(2)
John Morris, baptised 17/10/1708, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
(b)
William Morres, baptised 6/1/1669, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95] Married Alice Ashburn, 14/5/1694, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95] Married 2nd Elizabeth Williams, 6/10/1706, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
Children: (1)
 
Thomas Moris, baptised 27/6/1703, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
(2)
William Moris, baptised 27/7/1707, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
(3)
Elizabeth Morris, baptised 26/3/1710, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95] Married Henry Yarrow, 22/7/1739, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
(c)
Thomas Morris, baptised 12/1673, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95] Died 1710.[189] Dated 12/2/1710-1711, the administration of the estate of Thomas, "(Admon.) Bond Grant for poor Thomas Morrice of Alveston."[189] Married Anne Lake, 30/6/1700, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
Children: (1)
 
Thomas Moris, baptised 1/6/1701, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
(2)
Thomas Moris, baptised 4/6/1704, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
(3)
George Morris, baptised 23/11/1707, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
(4)
Thomas Moris, baptised 25/11/1707, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
(5)
William Morris, baptised 14/10/1710, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]

ii.

Marie Morrisse, baptised 1/3/1634, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]
* iii.

Alice Morrise, baptised 5/3/1636, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95] Married John Dunn,[166,169] 2/1/1673, St Peter, Barford, Co Warwickshire, England.[166] Refer to Dunn chart for additional details & generations.
Children: (a)
 
Thomas Dunn, baptised 17/1/1674, St Peter, Barford, Co Warwickshire, England.[166]
(b)
Sarah Dunn, baptised 19/11/1676, St Peter, Barford, Co Warwickshire, England.[166]
(c)
Mary Dunne, baptised 22/4/1679, St Peter, Barford, Co Warwickshire, England.[166] Died 1679 & buried 17/5/1679, St Peter, Barford, Co Warwickshire, England.[166]

iv.

Sarah Morrice, baptised 4/8/1639, St James, Alveston, Co Warwickshire, England.[95]


St James, Alveston, 1837
Old St James, Alveston, 1837
Artist/Photographer unknown
Remains of old St James, Alveston
Remains of old St James, Alveston
Image C/E Fosse Deanery
New St James, Alveston (1839)
New St James, Alveston (built 1839)
Image David Howard [Geograph]
 Alveston is a parish in Warwickshire, England, to the east of Stratford-Upon-Avon. Its present boundaries seem to be approximately those given in a Saxon charter of 985. The suffix of “ton” in the names Alveston and Tiddington means a farmstead or settlement of Saxon origin. Alveston is believed to be named after Aenulf, a Saxon chief. The site of the Old Church also indicates that the original Saxon settlement was along Mill Lane leading to a ford across the river. Little is known of the early history of the village, except the granting of a Charter in 955 AD, although it is clearly an earlier settlement than the later and larger development of Stratford-upon-Avon. The origins of the name Tiddington are less clear. Possibly named after Tidda or Tilda. The earliest spelling was “Tidinctune” in 969. The parish includes the two separate villages of Alveston and Tiddington and part of the hamlet of Bridgetown. The Avon is crossed by a ferry at Alveston village and a ford near the mill, the 'Doddanford' of 985. Lower down the stream opposite Cliffe Cottage is the probable site of Welcombe Ford. There was an Iron Age settlement in Tiddington as shown by crop marks near the river. Tiddington has yielded abundant evidence both of Roman and Saxon occupation. A Roman industrial settlement yielded remains including a tile kiln, furnaces and coins indicating a prolonged occupation, which may even have survived the withdrawal of the legions. A Saxon cemetery, dating to the 8th and 9th centuries, was discovered in 1935. The Manor House, just east of Clopton Bridge, is mostly a timber-framed two story building, parts of which date to c.1500 or earlier. The Old Rectory, south-east of the church, with walls almost completely of close-set studding, dates to the early 1500s. The brick facing is somewhat more recent. Alveston Lodge, next to the rectory, is traditionally said to have been the residence of William More, Prior of Worcester, 1518–1535. In the Domesday Book Alveston parish was occupied by 43 families, about 200 people, larger than Stratford-upon-Avon at the time. The village lies chiefly east of the churches, and few of the houses are old. One noticeable house fairly near the ferry is of 17th-century timber-framing in two stories above a high stone basement. The mill at Alveston is mentioned as early as 966. Domesday records three mills here, worth 40s. In 1240 there were two corn mills in Alveston and a corn mill and fulling mill in Tiddington. Two watermills and a fishery were included with the site of the manor in 1570. In 1650 there were three water mills and a fulling mill near the manor-house. Alveston throughout its history has been essentially a freeholders' village. In 1240 the free tenements comprised more than one-third of the manor. The demesne in 1240 consisted of 4 carucates of land 'with the new addition'. By 1699 the heath was being ploughed and fenced in for corn, and a part of the Black Ground Field was hitched for feeding horses. A part of the heath was ordered to be laid down with grass seeds in 1704, and within the next 30 years these new crops, among which clover is first specifically mentioned in 1719, were introduced into four of the common fields, being generally sown together with oats or barley. The cultivation of turnips for sheep feed began on the heath in 1729. A petition for inclosure was approved by the House of Commons in 1771. The inclosure established 6 large farms ranging from 142 to 407 acres, and 5 others of between 50 and 100 acres. Smaller allotments were made to 9 other proprietors. The largest holdings were those of Newsham Peers, Lord Lifford (300 acres, now Alveston Pasture Farm), and Thomas Hiron (now Alveston Hill Farm, 275 acres). The great majority of the individual proprietors came of families which had been settled in the parish since before 1600. Tiddington, although from earliest times a separate township from Alveston, has never been a separate manor. Although the first major battle of the English civil war was fought at Edgehill, only 14 miles away, Alveston, largely escaped the full force of war with only minor threats, thefts and skirmishes. In 1744 Alveston was lauded as a health spa. On Alveston Hill there was a spring and a pool where the sick bathed in hope of a cure.
"Alveston, a village and a parish in Stratford on Avon district, Warwick. The village stands near the Avon, under Welcombe hills, amid charming environs, 2.5 miles ENE of Stratford-on-Avon; was pronounced by Dr. Parry the Montpelier of England; and has a post office under Stratford-on-Avon. The parish contains also the pleasant village of Tiddington. Acres, 4,300. Real property, 8,531. Pop., 844. Houses, 191. The property is much subdivided. A chief residence is Alveston House. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Worcester. Value, 220. Patron, the Rector of Hampton-Lucy. The church contains some fine tombs of the Lucys, and is very good. Charities, 46."[1872 Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales]
"Alveston, a village and a parish in Warwickshire. The village stands near the Avon, under Welcombe Hills, amid charming environs, 2 1/2 miles ENE of Stratford-on-Avon. It has a post, money order, and telegraph office under Stratford-on-Avon. The parish contains also the hamlets of Tiddington and Bridgetown. Acreage, 2886; population, 954. There are several gentlemen's residences in the village. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Worcester; value, 190. Patron, the rector of Hampton Lucy. The church formerly belonged to the abbey of Tewkesbury, and is an ancient stone edifice with transepts and a pinnacled western tower. It was restored in 1876, at a cost of 4000."[1895 Comprehensive Gazetteer of England and Wales]
The parish church is dedicated to St James. In 1837 it was resolved to build a new Church and on the 1/8/1837 the foundation stone of the present St James’ was laid by Mrs Fortescue-Knottesford of Alveston Manor. The completed building was consecrated on 16/5/1839 by the Bishop of Worcester. The present church of St James consists of a chancel with north and south chapels, a broad nave, south porch, and west tower. There are four bells, one modern, the others are dated 1658, 1616 inscribed 'god save noble king James and Thomas Townsend' and 1729. The architect for the new church, William Walker, reputedly designed the church based on Westminster Abbey. It has an imposing structure with a high roof space and impressive hammer beams and is considerably larger than its predecessor. The new building had seating for 570 people, 316 of which were declared to be “free and unappropriated for ever” (ie not assigned to a particular family). The construction costs were small, even for the time, just 2,640, much of the materials having been recycled from the old church. By 1871 the population of the Parish of Alveston had risen to almost 1,000. St James was considered too small and the east end of the church was enlarged in 1875. The tower was restored in 1945. The walls of the Lady Chapel are lined with seventeenth century panelling. The remains of the old parish church stand about 1/4 mile north and consist of the almost derelict chancel, built of 18th-century red brick with rusticated angle dressings, and covered with rough-cast cement; the roof is tiled. The east window is unglazed. In the south wall was a doorway, now blocked to form an external recess. In this is reset the elaborately carved tympanum of a 12th-century doorway, and two carved capitals. There are eight funeral monuments inside, the oldest and most interesting of which is that of Nicholas Lane, who died 1595. There is no mention of a priest at Alveston in the Domesday Survey. In 1240 the church was a chapelry of Hampton Lucy, remaining such until 1858. Although the old church fell into disuse it was not totally demolished, the chancel was left intact. The Old Church was restored in 1945 and again between 2000-2005. In 2006 it was rededicated by the Bishop and it remains in use as a church today, with a weekly service in Summer.[Alveston Parish History, Parish of Alveston, British History Online]
"The old church, dedicated to St James, which adjoins the park of Alveston House, and in which most of the members of the family of Peers lie buried, is now but a ruin. The chancel, with a bellcote, is all that remains of the original structure, the nave having been pulled down when the present church was built, about a quarter of a mile distant, in 1839. Beyond the monuments and two carvings in stone of the thirteenth century there is nothing of interest in this church, which is now used for funeral services for the members of such families as have vaults in the churchyard.'[Miscellanea genealogica et heraldica, 1906]
 

Medieval cottage, Alveston
Medieval cottage, Alveston
Image Ian Paterson [Geograph]
St Nicholas, Warwick, 1867
St Nicholas, Warwick, 1867
William Collis, A Victorian Sketch Book
St Peter, Barford, c.1900
St Peter, Barford, c.1900
Artist/Photographer unknown
 St Nicholas, Warwick, once called the 'Low ' church', (simply because it was further down the hill from St. Mary's, the 'High' church), was one of the two ancient parish churches of Warwick, in the later middle-ages. The old church dated back to Norman times, and may have been older still, with possibly an earlier Saxon nunnery on the same site. By the mid 18th. century, it was in a very poor state of repair, and the tower, which was causing great concern, was taken down, and replaced in 1748. In 1779 local architect Thomas Johnson, rebuilt the church, to his own design. A vestry was added in 1826, and the chancel was rebuilt in 1869-70 to the designs of John Gibson. St Nicholas is an example of Gothic revival architecture, pre-dating the Victorian period, and displaying a delicate & simple style. Internally the unusually fine columns support a squared capitol, from which rises a very shallow vaulted plaster ceiling.  With only four free standing pillars, the essence of the building is a light and airy square space with large decorated style windows. Originally built with a small rounded apse, the former chancel arch has been filled in.[St Nicholas, Warwickshire Churches] 


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Refer to the Hiccox chart for sources.