Blundell's of Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England
Synopsis: Blundell's of Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England

Stratford-Upon-Avon District, Co Warwickshire Group Index
   
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Robert Blundell & his wife, Ruth Lane, first appear in Birmingham with their marriage in 1732. Birmingham parish records are available only back to 1715 so tracing Robert & Ruth's ancestry is, at this stage, not possible. A Blundell family appears in Birmingham in the late 1700s and into the 1800s. This family is however, not related and arrived in Birmingham from elsewhere.


1. Robert Blundell,[30] probably born between 1695-1715. Died 1756 & buried 15/6/1756, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[1] {Burial also registered at St Martin's, same date.[1]} Married Ruth Lane, 10/9/1732, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30] Ruth died 1794 & buried 2/11/1794, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[1]

Children of Robert Blundell & Ruth Lane:

i.
 
John Blundon, baptised 7/5/1735, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30] Died 1779 & buried 23/2/1779, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[1] Married Mary Gunn, 29/12/1763, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30] Mary, d/o Henry Gunn, baptised 20/4/1733, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30] Mary died 1774 & buried 24/5/1774, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[1]
Children: (a)
 
Edward Blondell, baptised 11/1/1765, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30] Died 1769 & buried 13/5/1769, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[1,30]
(b)
Ann Blundell, baptised 4/4/1766, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30]
(c)
Catherine Blundall, baptised 1/7/1768, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30]

ii.

Robert Blundon, baptised 29/4/1737, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30] Married Margaret Hickin, 26/9/1768, Saint Martin, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[42]
Children: (a)
 
Anne Blundell, baptised 26/8/1769, Saint Martin, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[42] Married John Snedwell, 3/2/1797, Saint Martin, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[42]
(b)
Mary Blundell, baptised 7/2/1771, Saint Martin, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[42] Died 1772 & buried 29/10/1772, Saint Martin, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[1,42]
(c)
Sarah Blundell, baptised 21/7/1773, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30]
(d)
Margaret Blundell, baptised 2/1/1778, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30] Died 1779 & buried 18/3/1779, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[1]
* iii.

Elizabeth Blundell, baptised 24/8/1739, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30] Married Edward Hiccox,[24,34] 30/1/1763, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30] Edward born c.1741.[43] Died 1777 & buried 14/6/1777, Whitechapel, London, Co Middlesex, England (36yo).[43] Resided 1763,1764, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[34,35] Resided 1765, Temple Bar, London, England.[32] Resided 1766, London, England.[33] Refer to Hiccox chart for additional details.
Children: (a)
 
Rebecca Hiccox, born 1/3/1764 & baptised 5/3/1764, Saint Dunstan-in-the-West, London, England.[24] Married George Spinks, 18/3/1787, Saint Dunstan, Stepney, London, England.[2] Refer to Spinks chart for descendants.
(b)
Mary Hiccocks, born 25/7/1765 & baptised 26/8/1765, Saint Dunstan-in-the-West, London, England.[24]
(c)
Edward Hiccox, baptised 14/6/1770, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30]

iv.

Ann Blundell, baptised 6/4/1741, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30] No further record, possibly died young.

v.

Sarah Blundell, baptised 19/9/1744, Saint Philip's, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[30] Married Thomas Sheldon, 5/10/1775, Saint Martin, Birmingham, Co Warwickshire, England.[42]


St Philips, Birmingham, 1829
St Philips, Birmingham, 1829
Engraving - Thomas Radclyffe
Medieval Pins
St Philips, Birmingham, c.1900
Artist/Photographer unknown
East view of Birmingham, c.1780
East view of Birmingham, c.1780
Artist/Photographer unknown
 Birmingham is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands county of England. It is the second most populous British city, after London, with a population of 1,028,701 in 2009. A medium-sized market town during the medieval period, Birmingham grew to international prominence in the 18th century at the heart of the Midlands Enlightenment and subsequent Industrial Revolution, which saw the town at the forefront of worldwide developments in science, technology and economic organisation, producing a series of innovations that laid many of the foundations of modern industrial society. By 1791 it was being hailed as "the first manufacturing town in the world". Birmingham's distinctive economic profile, with thousands of small workshops practising a wide variety of specialised and highly-skilled trades, encouraged exceptional levels of creativity and innovation, and provided a diverse and resilient economic base for an industrial prosperity that was to last into the final quarter of the 20th century. Some of the earliest evidence of settlement in Birmingham are artefacts dating back 10,400 years discovered near Curzon Street in the city centre. In the early 7th century, Birmingham was an Anglo-Saxon farming hamlet on the banks of the River Rea. It is commonly believed that the name 'Birmingham' comes from "Beorma inga ham", meaning farmstead of the sons (or descendants) of Beorma. Birmingham was first recorded in written documents by the Domesday Book of 1086 as a small village, worth only 20 shillings. In 1166 the holder of the manor of Birmingham, Peter de Birmingham, was granted a royal charter to hold a market in his castle, which in time became known as the Bull Ring, transforming Birmingham from a village to a market town. The de Birmingham family continued to be Lords of Birmingham until the 1530s when Edward de Birmingham was cheated out of its lordship by John Dudley. As early as the 16th century, Birmingham's access to supplies of iron ore and coal meant that metalworking industries became established. By the time of the English Civil War in the 17th century, Birmingham had become an important manufacturing town with a reputation for producing small arms. Arms manufacture in Birmingham became a staple trade and was concentrated in the area known as the Gun Quarter. During the Industrial Revolution Birmingham grew rapidly into a major industrial centre and the town prospered. Birmingham’s population grew from 15,000 in the late 17th century to 70,000 a century later. By the 1820s, an extensive canal system had been constructed, giving greater access to natural resources to fuel to industries. Railways arrived in Birmingham in 1837. During the Victorian era, the population of Birmingham grew rapidly to well over half a million and Birmingham became the second largest population centre in England.[Wikipedia]
St Philip, Birmingham. The Cathedral Church of Saint Philip is the Church of England cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of Birmingham. Built as a parish church and consecrated in 1715, St Philip's became the cathedral of the newly-formed Diocese of Birmingham in 1905. St Philip's was built in the early 18th century in the Baroque style by Thomas Archer. It is the third smallest cathedral in England. St Philip's Church was planned when the nearby medieval church of St Martin in the Bull Ring became insufficient to house its congregation because of the growing population of Birmingham. The land, previously named The Barley Close, was donated by Robert Philips in 1710. It it was dedicated to the Apostle Philip as a tribute to the benefactor Robert Philips. St Philip's served as a Parish church from 1715 to 1905. The tower was completed in 1725. Externally the Baroque style building is surrounded by tall windows between pilasters of low relief, supporting a balustrade at roof level with an urn rising above each pilaster. The western end is marked by a single tower which rises in stages and is surmounted by a lead-covered dome and delicate lantern. The building is of brick and is faced with stone quarried on Thomas Archer’s estate at Umberslade.[Wikipedia, St Philips Church]
 

St Martin, Birmingham, c.1690
St Martin's, c.1690
Engraving Robert Dent
St Martin, Birmingham, 1850
St Martin, Birmingham, 1850
Painting - William Radclyffe
East View of Birmingham, 1732
East View of Birmingham, 1732
Engraving - William Westley
 St Martin in the Bull Ring, Birmingham, England was the original parish church of Birmingham. It is believed that there was a Norman Church on the site as early as 1166. The medieval church was built in 1290, from red sandstone, by the de Bermingham family. The present Victorian church was built on the site of a 13th century predecessor, which was documented in 1263. The church was enlarged in medieval times and the resulting structure consisted of a lofty nave and chancel, north and south aisles and a northwest tower with spire. In 1547, although no record is kept to indicate when the first clock appears in Birmingham, during this year the King's Commissioners report that the Guild of the Holy Cross are responsible "ffor keeping the Clocke and the Chyme" at a cost of four shillings and four pence a year at St Martin's Church. In 1690, the churchwardens "dressed the church in brick". All was cased in brick with the exception of the spire. John Cheshire rebuilt 40 feet of the spire in 1781, which was strengthened by an iron spindle running up its centre for a length of 105 feet. It was secured to the sidewalls at every ten feet by braces. In 1801, several metres from the top of the spire were replaced after they were found to have decayed. The tops of the four pinnacles surrounding the main spire were also rebuilt. By 1808, the spire had been struck by lightning three times. In 1853, the brick casing was removed from the tower by Philip Charles Hardwick, who added the open-air pulpit. The church also contained an organ, the reedwork of which had been done by John Snetzler. However, the pipes were found to be ineffective due to their proximity to the church roof and walls. In 1873, the church was demolished and rebuilt, preserving an earlier tower and spire. During the demolition, medieval wall paintings and decorations were discovered in the chancel, including the charity of St Martin dividing his cloak with a beggar. The exterior is built of rockfaced grimshill stone. The interior is of sandstone and an open timber roof.[Wikipedia, St Martin in the Bullring, Birmingham Churches]
 


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Refer to the Hiccox chart for sources.