Irwin's of Co Tyrone, Ireland and thence Australia, Canada & New Zealand

Surname Index Page Irwin Index Page My Irwin's of Ballygawley, Co Tyrone My Irwin's of New Zealand My Irwin's of Canada My Irwin's of Australia Unrelated Irwin Families Sources

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Cavey to Australia

Irwin Family Reunion, Dungog, 1987
Irwin Family Reunion, Dungog, 1987
Image - Colin Irwin
John Irwin was the son of Thomas Irwin & Isabella Dunbar of Cavey townland, near Ballygawley, Co Tyrone, Ireland. John & his family emigrated to Australia in 1837. After a few years in Sydney he moved to the Maitland district, remaining there for about 10 years before moving again to settle at Tillegra, near Dungog. Details on John's residency in Ireland is rather confused, no doubt due to the lack of primary records covering his life in Ireland. His gravestone indicates he was a native of Ballygawley,[10] the closest town of note to John's birthplace, Cavey townland. The obituary of his son, Thomas, born c.1830, states Thomas was born in Co Antrim, Ireland.[4,10] A compiled genealogy claims his son, James, born c.1833, was born in Co Armagh, Ireland.[4] The obituary of his son, John Jr, born c.1835, states John Jr was born in Co Tyrone, Ireland.[4] A compiled genealogy on the family claims that Thomas (1830) was born in Derry, Co Londonderry, Ireland, and John (1835) was born in Londonderry, Ireland (does not specify whether county or town).[4] In the case of John Jr & Thomas, the claims contradict details given in the respective obituaries. All that is certain is that John & Jane probably married in Ballygawley (or a nearby townland) and that they emigrated from Ireland, departing from Londonderry. Where John & Jane were between their marriage (c.1828/1829) & when they left Ireland (1837) is a mystery. It is possible that the claims that some of the children were born in Londonderry may be assumptions based on the family having departed from there when leaving Ireland. Attempts to find the baptisms of the children in Ireland have proven unsuccessful. An exhaustive search of surviving church registers for Ballygawley & surrounding townlands contains no reference to the marriage or any baptisms, however these records are fragmentary. If the details given in the obituaries (etc) are to be believed, then John resided Co Antrim (1830), Co Armagh (1833) & Co Tyrone (1835).[4] The last is probably incorrect and is more likely to have been Co Londonderry, Ireland.

Jane Kirkpatrick appears to have been a native of Ballygawley (or a nearby townland). Her death certificate gives her parents as James Kirkpatrick & Christina Wilson.[186] There were at least two children born around 1820, in or near Ballygawley to a James & Christina Kirkpatrick & it seems reasonable to assume these were the parents of Jane and that further she was born in or near Ballygawley and Jane & John also married in Errigal Keerogue parish, Co Tyrone (which includes the town of Ballygawley). The events do not appear in the register for the Ballygawley Church of Ireland and the records for the Presbyterian church only date back to 1842, several years after John & his family had emigrated to Australia. According to the research of Rev. George Irwin a relative of Jane Kirkpatrick was transported to Australia as a convict and died in the Dungog area, however the name of this relative and his or her name is unknown.[409] Several Kirkpatricks died in Gulgong in the 1870s,[15] but this would be far too recent for a sibling of Jane.



1.1.1. John Irwin,[3,9,187,211] born 1802/1803,[4,5,10,113,203] Cavey townland, Errigal Keerogue parish, County Tyrone, Ireland.[4,10,113,184,211] Died 10/7/1875, Tillegra (near Dungog), NSW, Australia (72yo).[4,5,10,15,184,203] Cause of death listed as "old age".[5] Informant was Thomas Irwin (son) of Tillegra.[5] Buried 12/7/1875, Allotment 107, Section B9, Presbyterian Section, Anleys Flat Cemetery (now Dungog General Cemetery), NSW, 12/7/1875,[5,10,185] Rev. John Gibson, Church of Scotland, officiating,[5,10] in allotment 107, section B9, Presbyterian Section.[185] John's headstone describes him as a "Native of Ballygalley, County Tyrone, Ireland".[10] {Ballygalley is a mis-spelling of Ballygawley, the nearest town to Cavey townland, where John was born, and the location of the nearest church} Blacksmith and 'working engineer' (sic), prior to his emigration from Ireland.[4] Blacksmith, 1837 - 1875.[5,10,187,211] Upon arrival in Sydney, NSW, John spent three years working as a blacksmith ('iron trade') in Sydney for the government.[4,184] Among the projects John worked on was Darlinghurst Gaol, of whom he was one of the first workers on that project.[4] In 1840 he left the government employ and moved, with his family, to Maitland, NSW, in the Hunter River district, north of Sydney, where he operated three forges on Morpeth Road, East Maitland.[4,10,184] About 1847 he moved to Bandon Grove, on the Upper William's River where he was the first blacksmith in that area.[4,10,184] Married JaneKirkpatrick,[4,5,10,187,203,211] c.1828 (John aged 25yo[5] & Jane aged 20yo[186]),[5] Ireland.[4,10,184,186] Jane was born 1809, d/o James &
Children of John & Jane Irwin
Children of John & Jane Irwin
Rear L-R: James, Robert, Thomas,
George &
William.
Front L-R: John, Mary & Richard.
c.1870's
Image - David Powell

Christina,[186] Ireland,[4] died 27/4/1886, Bendolba, NSW, Australia.[4,10,15,184,186,203] {Whilst there is no primary evidence for the birthplace of Jane or the location of the marriage, a James & Christina Kirkpatrick, of the right age, were in Errigal Keerogue parish around 1820 and it is likely they were Jane's parents. There is no surviving record for Jane's baptism, however her death certificate gives the names of her parents. See the Kirkpatrick chart for additional information} Jane was buried 28/4/1886, Hanley's Flat Cemetery (now Dungog General Cemetery), NSW by Rev. David Baird of the Presbyterian Church.[10,186,203] Cause of death listed as "old age", of 14 days duration.[186] The informant was Thomas Irwin (son) of Bandon Grove (near Dungog).[5]
  "Dungog - Old Mrs Irwin, of Telligra, one of the very oldest residents of the Upper Williams, passed over to the great majority last Tuesday morning. She was widely known and highly respected, as was evinced by the unprecedentedly numerous cavalcade that followed her remains to the cemetery on Thursday. She had reached a good old age, bordering upon four score, and had out lived her husband some eight or nine years. She had lived to see all her family grown up and settled in life, and numerous grandchildren and great grandchildren, all well-to in the world." (Maitland Mercury, 6/5/1886).[14]  
John and his family emigrated to NSW, Australia on the "Adam Lodge", as assisted ("Bounty") passengers, departing from Londonderry, Ireland, 29/3/1837, and arriving at Sydney, NSW, Australia, 13/7/1837.[4,5,10,183,184,211] John and Jane were listed as "protestant"[10] {presumably presbyterian}. John was listed as literate, of good character, with no relatives in NSW and a blacksmith.[10] The official report on the voyage noted that "these immigrants were not placed in the Government Buildings, but provided themselves with Lodgings and obtained employment without difficulty, and were considered as acceptable to the colony; but the number of children interfered very much to the prejudice of the agricultural men in obtaining employment".[183] The "Adam Lodge" ship weighted 467 tons & was captained by Captain Main. There were 83 male, 81 female, 20 single female and 195 children, for a total of 379 passengers on board the ship.[4] By 19/5/1856 John had taken possession of the grant of (the then) late Mr. C. Windeyer.[340] "An application was made by William Foster, for a new road from his land at Mulconda, to the main road leading to Dungog. Mr. Mullen appeared for the applicant, Mr. Chambers on behalf of Mr. A. Windeyer, and Mr. O'Meagher for Mr. Irwin, now in tenancy of the late Mr. C. Windeyer's grant, opposed the application. The service of notices was admitted. The witnesses called were Trentham M'Kay, Alexander Smith, and Alfred Richardson. It appeared that two lines of road had been surveyed; that applied for being the shorter, but almost exclusively for Mr. Foster's benefit, whilst the other, of more general utility, passed between the lands of the two opponents. The application was granted for a road along the line recommended by the surveyor, namely, the second one referred to. The Court then adjourned sine die."[340] {The location of this road is unknown. Mulconda is possibly connected to the present day Mulconda Lane, which is to the north-east and east of Bandon Grove. The original Windeyer grant, where John was living, was to the south-west of Bandon Grove. William Forster was born c.1797, Co Kerry, Ireland, arrived Hobart, Australia in 1829 & married Maria Irwin. What connection, if any, between Maria and the Irwin's of Cavey, Co Tyrone, is unknown.[341] Maria, d/o Samuel & Jessie, died 1902.[15]} In 1868 had a property near Bandon Grove: "Parish Road, from the Dungog and Chichester River Road to the west boundary of John Campbell's 40 acres conditional purchase, above The Underbank Estate, running through the lands supposed to be the property of A. Windeyer, T. Irwin, J. Irwin, T. Curran, D. M'Lennun, S. F. Mann, A. M'Lennan, A. M'Dougal, J. Jewhurst, T. M'Williams, W. Edwards, and J. Campbell, the Williams River Village Reserve, and through Crown lands. Plan and Book of Reference, showing the intended line of the road abovenamed, are now deposited at the Office of the Surveyor-General, in Sydney, and the Police Office, Dungog. All objections to be addressed, in writing, to the Clerk of the Executive Council within one month from 24th March, 1868."[340] {The T. Irwin is John's son, Thomas. J. Irwin is probably John Sr, however it may have been James, although he would have only been in his early 20's at the time. It is possible that by 1868 John had split his land between his eldest two sons, James & Thomas, both of whom owned land in what was known as Tillegra, relinquishing ownership and living with one or both of his eldest sons. More likely Thomas had aquired land from his father by 1868 & James some years later, possibly on John's death - the earliest reference to James owning land at Tillegra was in 1880. Whilst some of the younger sons farmed at 'Tillegra', there is no evidence they owned any land & probably worked on the land belonging to first their father and then one of their brothers (probably Thomas since James had sold his land by the early 1880's). From the information in the report, the parish road in question is the present day Salisbury Road, which runs from the Chicester Dam Road through to Underbank & then some distance north before petering out} Resided 1830, Co Antrim, Ireland.[4] Resided 1833, Co Armagh, Ireland.[4] Resided 1835, Co Londonderry, Ireland.[4] Resided 1837-1840, Bathurst Street, Sydney.[4,184] Resided 1841, Morpeth (near Maitland), NSW.[4,5,10,15,186] Resided 1844-1847, Dalwood (near Branxton), NSW.[4,5,10,15,186] Resided 1849-1886, Tillegra (near Dungog), NSW.[4,5,10,186,340]

Children of John Irwin & Jane Kirkpatrick:
*
i.
 
Thomas Irwin,[203,205] born 1830,[4,5,186,215] County Antrim, Ireland.[4,10]
*
ii.

James Irwin, born 11/7/1833,[4,5,10,15,186,215] County Armagh,[4] Ireland.[4,186]
*
iii.

John Irwin,[210,211] born 1835,[4,5,10,186,204,215] County Londonderry,[4] Ireland.[186,204]

iv.

William Irwin, born 9/10/1838, Bathurst St, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[4,5,186,203,215] Died 23/7/1892, Dungog, NSW.[4,15,203] Did not marry.[4,10,215] On 20/1/1879 William applied for a gold mining lease at Copeland, NSW, along with his brothers James, Thomas & George.[229] They took possession of the lease 9/1/1879.[229] J. E. Hicks was the surveyor.[229]
*
v.

George Orr Irwin, born 1841, Morpeth, NSW, Australia.[4,5,10,15,186,215]
* vi.
Robert Irwin, born 12/7/1844, Dalwood (near Maitland), NSW.[4,5,10,186,187,215]
*
vii.
Mary Ann Irwin, born 1846, Maitland.[4,5,10,15,186,215]
*
viii.
Richard Dunbar Irwin, born 22/12/1849, Tillegra, NSW.[4,5,10,186,215]


Archibald & Catherine Irwin's homestead, Cavey
One of the Irwin farms, Cavey, Co Tyrone
Image Robert Irwin
George St, Sydney, looking north from Bathurst St, 1842
George St, Sydney, north from Bathurst St, 1842
Image - J. S. Prout, City of Sydney Archives
Darlinghurst Gaol, Sydney, 1891
Darlinghurst Gaol, Sydney, 1891
Henry Louis Bertrand, NSW State Library

Cavey is a townland in the civil (as distinct from ecclesiastical) parish of Errigal Keerogue, Co Tyrone, Ireland. The parish is centred economically & politically on the town of Ballygawley, which lies in the far east of the parish. Cavey itself is about 2-3km north-west of Ballygawley. Irish townlands should not be confused with towns. In Irish nomenclature, a 'town' is the familiar geopolitical entity. Townland is the smallest geographical division of land used in Ireland. They vary in size from as small as two thirds of an acre up to 7,000 acres. Townlands were first named and their boundaries defined under the English legal system during the process of plantation. The English term townland is derived from the Old English word 'tun', meaning a homestead, or settlement. The Gaelic term was 'baile fearainn', which translates as 'town land/territory/quarter'. For the most part, the townlands predate the English occupation of Ireland when land was measured in terms of its economic potential rather than in its actual size (hence the wide range of townland sizes) - the more productive the land, the smaller the townland.[Wikipedia] Refer to Co Tyrone chart for additional background material on Ballygawley. Darlinghurst Gaol was located in Darlinghurst, Sydney. Initially designed by Francis Greenway, construction began in 1822. Because Greenway was an ex-convict, he was taken off the job and his plans were not used. Instead, the jail was built using the plans of a jail in Philadelphia, with work beginning in 1835. By 1840 some of the cellblocks had been completed and the first prisoners occupied the gaol on 76/6/1841. The gaol was finally completed in 1885. Darlinghurst Gaol then remained the main Sydney gaol until 1914, when the remaining prisoners were transferred to the new Long Bay Gaol. During its long life, Darlinghurst Gaol hosted public executions on a makeshift gallows outside the main gate in Forbes Street, as well as regular "private" executions on the permanent gallows just inside the main walls. 76 people were executed including the bushranger "Captain Moonlight", "Jimmy Blacksmith" and the last woman to hang in NSW, Louisa Collins. Australian poet Henry Lawson spent time incarcerated there, for drunkenness and non payment of alimony, and described the gaol as Starvinghurst Gaol due to meagre rations given to the inmates. The site is now open to the public as The National Art School. The last hanging at the gaol was in 1907.[Wikipedia, Thin Blue Line]

Blacksmith, Abermain (nr Maitland), c.1904
Blacksmith, Abermain (nr Maitland), c.1904
Image - Abermain Heritage Preservation Society
High St, West Maitland, c.1840
High St, West Maitland, c.1840
Image - The Arnott's
Swan St, Morpeth, c.1930
Swan St, Morpeth, c.1930
Image - Morpeth (Bruce Fairhall)

Morpeth is located on the southern banks of the Hunter River, near Maitland. The first Europeans in the area were the party of Lt Col. Paterson who undertook an exploration of the Hunter River in 1801. Paterson named the locality Green Hills. The land around Morpeth was granted in 1821 to Lt Edward Close, a veteran of the Napoleonic Wars. Close built an impressive homestead, Closebourne House, around 1826. A bridge over Wallis Creek was erected in 1827 promoting trade with the township of Wallis Plains (now Maitland) which, although 40 km away by river, was just 5km by road. From 1827-1830 Green Hills slowly developed as a river port. The locality took off after 1831 with the establishment of a regular paddlesteamer traffic to the port. In 1832 the first proper wharf was erected and the first two inns were licensed. A proper road to Maitland was built by convict labour in 1833. The land was subdivided and the first lots sold in 1834. A private town was established which, at this time, took the name Morpeth which was originally the name of a town near Newcastle in England. Morpeth became the major port of the Hunter Valley and surrounding districts between 1832 and 1890 with a regular steamer service operating to Maitland, up to Paterson and down to Newcastle. An important trade, cultural, commercial and religious centre, much of the Hunter Valley's produce passed through its wharves en route to Newcastle and Sydney while most persons and goods headed from those centres into the valley and beyond also set foot on its wharves. The first school was established in 1836. A Catholic Church was built in 1836 and the foundation stone of St James' Church of England Church was laid in 1837. The first post office opened in 1838, a steam mill was built in 1840 and a soap works in 1844. In the 1840s Caleb Soul, of Soul-Pattison pharmaceuticals, manufactured talcum powder and William Arnott, later of Arnott's biscuits, had a bakery here. The first national school opened in 1862, the year the population peaked at 1830. There were ten hotels in the town when it became a municipality in 1866. By the 1860's Newcastle had begun to grow, and the Great Northern Railway, which reached Maitland in 1857, initially bypassed Morpeth. By 1870 the river had begun to silt up and the completion of the rail link between Newcastle and Sydney in 1889 sealed the fate of the river trade and the fortunes of Morpeth. Morpeth was formally amalgamated into the City of Maitland in 1969.[Wikipedia, The Age] Maitland is is sited on the banks of the Hunter River, 35km north-west of Newcastle. Originally Maitland consisted of three separate towns which arose roughly all around the same time. West Maitland, now just Maitland, was a privately founded town which grew because of its proximity to the river and which today is the commercial centre of the city. East Maitland which was established by the colonial New South Wales government and Morpeth another private town. The present city was proclaimed in 1945 with the amalgamation of the three local government areas. West Maitland was founded in 1820 close to the tidal reach of the Hunter River where vessels with a shallow draft could navigate. Nearby Morpeth served as the head of navigation for larger ships (later, steamships), and goods would be transshipped upriver to West Maitland on barges and smaller vessels. Originally the route river route between Morpeth and West Maitland was 26km, today after various floods and river course changes this has reduced to just 9km. Maitland was therefore the point at which goods were unloaded for, and distributed to, the prosperous riverland of the Hunter Valley. Accordingly there were large warehouses built, which faced onto the main High Street and backed onto the Hunter River. For almost 20 years until the Victorian gold rush, Maitland was the second largest town in Australia. The arrival of the railway from Newcastle in the 1850s, coupled with the increasing silting of the river and larger ships spelt the end of the traditional river traffic. Unlike nearby Morpeth, Maitland was not a planned town. The original bullock track became fixed as the line of the main street (High Street). The town is rare in still having many of the buildings erected within the first ten years of settlement. In the 1800's Maitland was home to a wide range of business, including flourmills, breweries, a bacon and tobacco factory, soap and candle making and salt store. Iron workers, blacksmiths and saddlers also thrived.[Wikipedia, Maitland]

Dalwood House, nr Branxton, 1981
Dalwood House, nr Branxton, 1981
Image  Historic Buildings of Maitland District.[374]
Dungog district, 1837, showing land grants
Dungog district, 1837, showing land grants
Image - Hunter Valley Settlers (see below)
Williams River, Tilligra
Williams River, Tilligra
Image - Family of Henry Bignall

Dalwood is a geopolitical district. Today, as in the past, it consists of a collection of farms scattered along Dalwood Road (and a few side roads). There is no village as such. When John Irwin had a son born at Dalwood in 1844 he was almost certainly living and working on the farm of George Wyndham, who named his house Dalwood. Dalwood House, near Branxton (midway between Maitland & Singleton), was built & designed by George Wyndham, one of Australia's first vintners. Today the house is still part of the Wyndham Estate Winery. The house is a long & low single storeyed building of stone with projecting wings, one of which has been demolished, formed & protected a U-shaped courtyard to the rear. The front entrance is flanked by two massive Doric columns. The rooms facing the east open through french doors onto a verandah which is stone flagged in a diamond pattern. Construction began in 1829 & completed in 1838, although it was occupied as early as 1830. It is a rare surviving example of one of the earliest Greek revival buildings in NSW.[374, Heritage NSW, National Trust] In the map above showing the Dungog district land grants in 1837, the Windeyer & J. Dowling grants are at the confluence of the Chichester & Williams Rivers, Dowlings to the north, Windeyer's to the south. The Anley grant is the site of present day Dungog. Bandon Grove is on the northern bank of the Williams River, at the confluence with the Chichester River. Bendolba is between the Windeyer & Thompson grants.





1.1.1.1. Thomas Irwin,[205,222] born 1830,[4,5,186,203,215,230] County Antrim, Ireland.[4,10] {A compiled genealogy in [4] gives place of birth as "Derry" (sic), presumably either the city of Londonerry or the county} Died 9/3/1917, Bandon Grove, NSW,[4,10,15,203,205,215] buried Church of England Cemetery, Bendolba, NSW.[4,10]
  "Thomas Irwin, 9/3/1917. The pioneer of this district are one by one passing to the great beyond. On Friday last Mr Thomas Irwin, of Bandon Grove, passed peacefully away after a long life in the district. He was 87 years of age and was born in county Antrim, Ireland, and came to Bandon Grove with his parents nearly 70 years ago. He took a lively interest in the progress of the district, and with the late Mr James Barns was one of the founders of the local Agricultural Society of which he was vice president and an active worker for many years. He was a member of the local licensing bench, and sat with the late Mr Geo Mackay on the bench for nearly 40 years. He was also a prominent member of the Orange fraternity. He leaves 7 sons and 3 daughters. The former being George (Wickham), Frederick (North Sydney), R L (Bombala), Harry (West Australia), John, Thos and Frank (Bandon Grove) The daughters are Mrs Dixon, Mrs Howell and Miss Irwin. The funeral took place on Sunday last and was very largely attended, mourners coming from far and near to pay their last tribute of respect to deceased. His remains were interred beside those of his late wife in the pretty little cemetery at Bendolba, the Rev. D. M. Benjamin conducting the service. The funeral was a very large one and was headed by Messrs W Lees and Perry with the bagpipes playing 'Lord Loveth Lament'. Behind them came members of the orange lodge."(Dungog Chronicle, 13/3/1917).[4,10]  
Emigrated to NSW, Australia, 1837 with his parents.[4,10] Farmer & grazier.[4] On 26/12/1860 was awarded the Post Office mail contract for Dungog & Bandon Grove for the following year (1881), with mail to be delivered 3 days a week, at a salary of 28 per annum.[339] On 16/10/1875 was awarded the Post Office mail contract for Dungog & Bandon Grove for the following 3 years (1876-1878), with mail to be delivered 3 days a week on horseback, at a salary of 44 per annum.[339] In August, 1862, donated 10s to the 13 subscription list of the "Distress in the Manufacturing Districts" appeal, collected by Dr. McKinlay, Dungog, NSW.[339] In 1868 had a property near Bandon Grove: "Parish Road, from the Dungog and Chichester River Road to the west boundary of John Campbell's 40 acres conditional purchase, above The Underbank Estate, running through the lands supposed to be the property of A. Windeyer, T. Irwin, J. Irwin, T. Curran, D. M'Lennun, S. F. Mann, A. M'Lennan, A. M'Dougal, J. Jewhurst, T. M'Williams, W. Edwards, and J. Campbell, the Williams River Village Reserve, and through Crown lands. Plan and Book of Reference, showing the intended line of the road abovenamed, are now deposited at the Office of the Surveyor-General, in Sydney, and the Police Office, Dungog. All objections to be addressed, in writing, to the Clerk of the Executive Council within one month from 24th March, 1868."[339] {The T. Irwin is John's son, Thomas. J. Irwin is probably John Sr, however it may have been James, although he would have only been in his early 20's at the time. It is possible that by 1868 John had split his land between his eldest two sons, James & Thomas, both of whom owned land in what was known as Tillegra, relinquishing ownership and living with one or both of his eldest sons. More likely Thomas had aquired land from his father by 1868 & James some years later, possibly on John's death - the earliest reference to James owning land at Tillegra was in 1880. Whilst some of the younger sons farmed at 'Tillegra', there is no evidence they owned any land & probably worked on the land belonging to first their father and then one of their brothers (probably Thomas since James had sold his land by the early 1880's). From the information in the report, the parish road in question is the present day Salisbury Road, which runs from the Chicester Dam Road through to Underbank & then some distance north before petering out} On 17/11/1880 chaired a 'large meeting of electors' at the Robson's Hotel, Dungog, where William Johnson & H. Brown each gave an hour long campaign speech.[339]
In 1882 was the chairman of the committee that oversaw the construction of the Tillegra Bridge, over the Williams River:
  "The Opening of Tillegra Bridge over the Williams. The contractors having finished this splendid structure a few days ago, determined to make the christening ceremony and the opening of the bridge a gala day. Before giving you an account of the day's proceedings, a short description of the bridge itself may not be out of place. The Bridge is situated nearly midway between Dungog and Underbank, and at a place where the Williams river in flood times flows with great impetuosity, making the old or river-bed crossing very dangerous, and at times impassable, The first pile was started some seven months ago, the first stroke being given by V. F. Dowling, Esq. The work has steadily proceeded ever since. Some slight idea may be formed of the bridge when I mention that it is about 30 feet above the river bed, and the main or centre span will be about 80 feet wide ; the side spans will not be so great, they being - two 25 feet each, and one 35 feet. The contractors experienced very great difficulty in getting one set of piles erected, it being found impossible to drive them with the engine. They had to make an excavation in the solid rock and set the piles in concrete. This entailed a great expense and a long delay. However, the contractors were equal to the occasion, and have handed the bridge over to the Government in a first-class and splendidly finished manner. On Friday, the 20th October, this structure was thrown open to the public, and before being used it had to undergo the christening ceremony.
Children of John & Jane Irwin
Tillegra Bridge
Image
Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Precisely at 1 o'clock Mr. R. L. Collison, managing partner for the contractor, T. Bell, Esq., called upon Thos. Irwin, Esq., J.P., of Tillegra, who was chairman of the committee, to open the ceremony. Mr. Irwin having taken his place upon the centre arch of the bridge, and being surrounded by the committee, with the Public school children upon his right, and the public surrounding upon every little eminence which was likely to afford the slightest advantage. The chairman, who, upon rising, said, -Ladies and Gentlemen, -It affords me very great pleasure to be here to day, and I feel very proud of the honor conferred upon me. I will not make a lengthened speech at present, but I may mention that the young lady who the committee have chosen is one from amongst us. One who for her rainy acts of kindness and generosity in this neighbourhood has endeared her to all her acquaintances. Apart from this, if we ouly reflect that ber parents are amongst the oldest and are the most highly respected persons in the locality, it will, I feel be a sufficient explanation why our choice fell upon this particular young lady. I now call upon Miss Maria Dowling, of Caningalla, to perform the christening ceremony. Miss Dowling, having been presented with a neatly decorated bottle of champagne, she christened it 'Coningalla Bridge,' amidst loud and prolonged cheers, V. F. Dowling then stepped forward and said : Mr. Chairman and ladies and gentlemen, on behalf of my daughter and myself allow me to return you my sincere and heartfelt thanks for the honor you have this day done us, I feel very proud of the distinction shown to us in selecting a member of my family to perform this ceremony today. Again thanking you for this honor, I must ask you to excuse me from making a lengthened address at this moment as I am expected to say something at a future part of the day). The children from the three Public schools (Bandon Grove, Munnie, and Bendolba), then sang the National Anthem, Mr. Irwin then called for three cheers for Miss Dowling which was given in such a manner as to satisfy the most incredulous as to her popularity. The children then formed a procession and were marched off the bridge to a level; flat where they were liberallly provided with good things.
The Banquet took place in a large marquee erected for the occasion, and the chairman, V. F, Dowling, Esq., called upon those present to fill their glasses and drink to the 'Queen,' after the usual loyal toasts bad been gone through the chairman called upon Edwin Smith, Esq, J.P., to propose the toast of 'Our Visitors.' Mr. Smith, on rising, was received with loud cheers said, Mr. Chairman, ladies and gentlemen, It has fallen to my lot on this occasion to propose the health of our 'Visitors' and in in doing so I am sorry it had not been entrusted to a person more capable of doing the subject justice. As I am not accustomed to public speaking, and being naturally of a nervous disposition, I feel my present position anything but enviable, although I feel highly honored by being called upon to propose this toast. In proposing this toast, the ladies stand first. We owe them much for their presence here ; to-day; for although not particularly a 'ladies man,' still I am ready with thy majority if not all gentlemen to exclaim 'What would our festive gathering to-day be without them?' I am sorry our energetic member Mr. H. H. Brown, is not here to-day. Business has detained him, I also feel sorry for the absence of our late member Mr. Johnston ; I am sure that while he was our member ha worked hard for us. Without taking up more of your time, I will ask you to drink to the health of 'Our visitors.' W. Aldridge, Esq., J.P., of Dungog, rose in response to numerous calls and responded to this toast. This gentleman waa remarkably happy in his speech, and to say it was responded to by Mr. Aldridge is sufficient. The Chairman then called upon Mr. Haggerty to propose to the health of H. H. Brown, Esq., M.L.A. Mr. Haggerty Was received with cheers said, Mr. Chairman and ladies and gentlemen, I thank you with having honored us with this toast: H, H, Brown, Esq., M.L.A., has served us well and faithfully during the time he has reprended us. I need not enumerate all the good he has done, they surround us on all aides. After paying a very high tribute of respect to Mr. Brown, be resumed his seat amidst great cheering, the toast being drunk with the usual musical honors. Mr- J. R. Whitehouse responded on behalf of Mr. Brown, and pointed out some of the difficulties a member had to surmount in getting the many votes and grants of money for so large an electorate. Thomas Irwin, Esq., J.P proposed Mesera, Bell and Cherson, the contractors, in his usual happy manner. Mr. Bell on rising said, Mr. Chairman and gentlemen, I am very proud of the marked honor you have paid me and my managing partner, J. B. Collerson, for I feel that to him and him alone the honor is due of having finished this bridge in ita present style, and I can only hope that this noble structure which you and I have assisted to pass over to the public, may long withstand its greatest enemy, storms and floods. Mr. Collerson said: Mr. Chairman, Ladies, and Gentlemen,-I feel proud that I can say the work is finished, and I can now point to the structure and. say, 'There is a teatimonal of my abilities.' No doubt some may have thought the bridge should have been finished in a few days, or weeks, at the longest, but I would only ask them to remember there was a great difference between this bridge and a pole fence, To give them some idea he might mention that there was something like 62,000 or 63,000 cubic feet of timber in that structure and 1640 bolts, and 115 cubic feet of concrete. Mr. Bell then proposed the very difficult toast of 'The Ladies,' and an immense amount of merriment was caused by his remarks, It was responded to by J. D, Lord. Mr. W. english then proposed the toast of the Chairman, V. Dowling, Esq., coupled with the name of Mrs. Dowling, This toast was received with loud and prolonged cheers, the company singing 'For he's a jolly good fellow.' This brought the banquet to a close, after which the whole of the public joined in the various games. There was a grand ball and refreshments on this bridge at night, where dancing was kept up till the broad day light when your own was enabled to find his way home in safety."[349]
 
Justice of the Peace, 1881-1883.[338] Magistrate, Dungog, NSW, 1882.[338] Dungog Licensing Board, 1881.[338] Dungog Licensing Court (formed 1882), 1882,1883.[338] Senior magistrate, 1906.[339]
  On 31/1/1883 Thomas was involved with organising a fair in aid of the Protestant Hall, Dungog: "A bazzar and fancy fair was held in the Protestant Hall, Dungog, on Anniversary Day, under the auspices of the L. O. L. {Loyal Orange Lodge}. The day, which was a genuine Australian one, was suited in every way for the ceremony, although "old Sol," shone out rather warm at times, it was tempered by a very refreshing breeze. The bazaar was opened at 10 am by Mr Thomas Irwin, J.P., one of the trustees for the Hall. The stalls were ably attended bv the following Ladies :-Mrs. J. K. McKay, Mrs. Hill, Mrs. Geo, Irwin, Miss Read, Miss Hannah, Miss Alexander, Miss Wesley, Mrs. John Cornish and others. It would be very invidious, for me to say which of these good ladies did the most, but I may say that the whole of them worked with a will, and soon the numerous visitors, might be seen with sundry parcels. The contents of the various stalls would, as the auctioneer say, "be too numerous to mention," suffice to say that there were some very choice articles of silver ware, several silver watches, & I must not omit to mention one or two cushions, which to my fancy deserve more than a passing note. Whoever the workers were, tbey deserve to be known, at the articles to which I allude were something superb. The bazaar was kept open till about 11 pm, when nearly the whole of the goods had been carried off, but not till tbe fair stallholders had netted nearly 90. This of course will reduce the debt considerable, and as the trustees are very anxious to have the whole of the debt paid off shortly, as they are thinking of improving the hall by the addition of an anteroom and other little conveniences for concerts and lectures. I must wish them every success in their laudable efforts. I was very pleased to see the Dungog band present, and though only a few weeks since it was reformed, and hence a new band, you may say they played very well. I had almost forgotten to mention that one or two gentlemen connected with tbe hall thought as the law forbid raffling, etc, that they would try some other means of causing a little extra amusement, and bring money to their stall, -so behold! a large placard, inscribed 'Waterloo, 1815 - Meeting of Blucher and Wellington.' Now there was a grand rush, and after the 'local showman' had got his little room full he introduced them to this 'work of art,' a 'wellington boot and an old blucher ditto,' facing each other. It was worth threepence for the good laugh we had."[338]  
On 20/1/1879 Thomas applied for a gold mining lease at Copeland, NSW, along with his brothers James, William & George.[229] They took possession of the lease 9/1/1879.[229] J. E. Hicks was the surveyor.[229] On 2/5/1897 Thomas Sr applied for a gold mining lease at Dungog, NSW.[229] There is no record of the lease having been taken up.[229] On 21/11/1882 was informant at the death of Thomas Towers (father-in-law), died Tillegra, NSW, Thomas Irwin also of Tillegra, NSW.[354] On 26/12/1892 was informant at the death of Elizabeth Towers (mother-in-law), died Tillegra, NSW, Thomas Irwin also of Tillegra, NSW.[354] On 24/3/1906, "At the Dungog Courthouse on Saturday morning, in the presence of a large gathering of Justices of the peace, Mr. George Atkin, PM, was presented by Mr. Thomas Irwin, Senior magistrate, on behalf of the magistrates of the district, with a handsome illuminated address in album form, bearing the signatures of 25 Justices as a token of esteem prior to his departure for England on a holiday tour. The recipient spoke in grateful acknowledgment of the gift."[339] In July, 1906 was elected vice president of the Durham Agricultural & Horticultural Association for the following (financial) year, 1906/1907.[339] On 31/7/1908 was elected vice president of the Durham Agricultural & Horticultural Association for the following (financial) year, 1908/1909.[339] In July, 1909 was elected vice president of the Durham Agricultural & Horticultural Association for the following (financial) year, 1909/1910, at the same meeting it was moved to change the name of the association to the Dungog Agricultural & Horticultural Association.[339] {The association held its 116th annual show in 2009} Married Isabella Towers,[205,222] 8/5/1855, Dungog, NSW (presbyterian).[4,10,15,203,205,220,230] "At Dungog, on the 8th instant, by special license, by the Rev. Thomas Stirton, Mr. Thomas Irwin, of Telligrah, to Miss Isabella, third daughter of Mr. Towers, of Bendolba, near Dungog."[220] Isabella, d/o Thomas Towers & Elizabeth Fletcher,[4,354] was born 24/9/1837,[4,205,230] Morpeth, NSW,[4,230] died 22/3/1912 (74yo),[4,15,203,205] & buried at Bendolba Church of England Cemetery, Bendolba, NSW.[4]
  "Mrs Thomas Irwin. Death removed another unit from the fast thinning ranks of the early pioneers of the district, when on Friday afternoon last, the soul of Mrs Irwin the wife of Mr Thomas Irwin Snr, of Bandon Grove, was called over the Great Divide. Mrs Irwin had reached the advanced age of 74 years, most of which was spent on the Williams River, she was born at Morpeth, on the Hunter, her father being Mr Towers, one of the most prominent settlers of the district. At the age of 12 she arrived on the Williams, and was married to her husband, Mr Thomas Irwin in 1855. She was well-known among the settlers in the locality in which she resided for her hospitable and charitable disposition, and will be mourned by a host of sorrowing friends. Meeting all the trials and troubles of a pioneer, she faced the fight with nature with a spirit of fortitude and courage which characterised those sturdy settlers who carved themselves homes out of the wilderness. She leaves three daughters, Mrs Dixon (Mosman), Mrs Howell (Newcastle), and Miss Irwin (Bandon Grove), and 7 sons, Messrs George (Newcastle), Harry (Westralia Rd, Junee), Fred (Sydney), and John E, Thomas and Frank of Bandon Grove. She also leaves 30 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren. The funeral took place at Bendolba cemetery on Saturday afternoon, a large crowd following the cortege to the graveyard. The obsequies were carried out by the Venerable Archdeacon Luscombe and the Rev. D. M. Benjamin was also present. The Chronicle tenders its most sincere sympathy to the bereaved relatives and family in their time of trouble."(Dungog Chronicle, 26/3/1912).[4,230]  
Resided 1849-1917, Tillegra, near Bandon Grove, NSW.[4,186,220,339,354]

Children of Thomas Irwin & Isabella Towers:
* i.
 
John Edward Irwin, born 7/3/1856, Tillegra, Bendobla, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205,230]

ii.

Elizabeth Jane Irwin, born 11/11/1857, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205,215,230] Died 29/4/1935, Dungog, NSW.[163,203,205,215] Did not marry.[163,205] Resided 1912, Bandon Grove, NSW.[4]

iii.

infant Irwin, born 17/6/1860, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205,230] Died 26/6/1860, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205] Cause of death was influenza.[10]

iv.

George Henry Irwin, born 10/8/1861, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205,206,215,230] Died 26/11/1944, Newcastle, NSW (83yo).[4,15,203,206,215,230] Buried Sandgate cemetery, Newcastle.[4] Railway guard, 1917.[10] Married Amelia Jane Hancock,[215,230] 1884, Newcastle, NSW.[15,205,206] Amelia, d/o John & Caroline, born 10/10/1856,[206] & died 1947, Hamilton, NSW.[163] Resided 1912, Newcastle, NSW.[4] Resided 1907,1917, Wickham, NSW.[10,230] "A bolt of a sensational character occured on Monday afternoon at about 4 o'clock. Mrs J Bignall had occasion to visit Whitehead's Jewellery Hall, and left her baby boy and mother (Mrs Irwin, who is on a visit to Manilla), outside in a sulky. By some means the horse freed itself of the winkers, and made off. The animal turned the corner into Strafford-street, and was headed into Alexandra Lane by some gentlemen. The horse went up the lane, across Court-street and continued its mad career down the lane past Mr Odell's cordial factory. The bolt ended here, as the sulky came into contact with the corner of the fence near the railway embankment, and was capsized, the occupants being dashed heavily to the ground. Mrs Irwin was conveyed to the hospital, where it was ascertained that one of her legs was broken below the knee, and her body badly bruised. The baby, a bright little chap of 10 months, was cut above the eye. The couple had a miraculous escape from being more seriously injured. On inquiry yesterday afternoon at the hospital, we were informed that Mrs Irwin was doing well." (Manilla Express, 4/11/1908).[203,230] Resided 1916,1919, Fleming Street, Wickham, NSW.[376]
Children: (a)
 
Eva Isabella Irwin, born 1885, Newcastle, NSW [15,205,206,230] Died 1984 (99yo),[205,230] & buried Anglican section, Manilla Cemetery, Manilla, NSW.[230] Married James Alma Bignell, 3/1907, Hamilton, NSW.[15,205,230]
  "At the Hamilton Presbyterian Church, Newcastle, on Wednesday 20th March, the marriage of James, youngest son of Mr Henry Bignall, Arlington, Manilla, and Eva, eldest daughter of Mr George Irwin, Wickham, Newcastle, was celebrated by the Rev A. Thain Anderson. The service was choral, the church being prettily decorated for the occasion by members of the choir. The ceremony took place at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, after which a reception was held at the Wickham School of Arts, where about 40 guests sat down. The bridesmaids were Miss Veinie and Florrie Irwin, sisters of the bride, and Mr W. Kitcher of Newcastle acted as best man. The bride wore a pretty dress of cream embroidered crepe voile, with chiffon and silk trimmings, and court train, wreath and veil, and carried a white shower bouquet. The bridesmaids wore dresses of cream silk muslin, trimmed with valenciennes lace and insertion, with hats to match, and carried pale pink shower bouquets, and wore pearl wreath brooches, gifts of the bridegroom. The bride's going away dress was green embroidered crepoline with hat to match. The young couple were the recipients of many valuable and useful presents." (Manilla Express, 10/4/1907).[230]  
James was a farmer at 'Tyrone', Arlington, NSW.[230] James, s/o Henry & Emma, born 26/4/1880, Somerton, NSW, died 17/2/1957, Manilla, NSW (76yo),[163,205,230] & buried Anglican section, 19-60, Manilla Cemetery, Manilla, NSW.[230]
  "James Alma Bignall. The death took place at his home, Rowen St, Manilla, on February 17, of Mr James Alma Bignall within a week of his 77th birthday. The late Mr Bignall was born at Sandy Creek near Somerton in 1880, his father and mother the late Mr and Mrs H Bignall having come from Dungog. There was a large family and when James Bignall was only a youngster his parents, with their children, came to Manilla and founded the property 'Arlington' on the Tamworth road. As a young man the late Mr Bignall was keenly interested in sport. He played cricket and football and was a member of the Gun Club and the Manilla Rifle Club. In later years he joined the Manilla Bowling Club and represented Manilla in many interdistrict matches. In March 1907 he married Miss Eva Irwin of Newcastle and built his home at 'Tyrone' on the family property. There his family was reared and for many years he engaged in farming and grazing pursuits. Just three years ago the homestead block was sold though he retained farming property. With his wife he retired to his home in Rowen-street. The funeral service at the Church of England which he had always supported was attended by a large number of friends and relatives. The late James Bignall is survived by his wife, and family of three sons and one daughter viz:- Harry (Newcastle); Lindsay (Manilla); James (Barraba); and Joan (Mrs I Woolfe, Manilla). There are nine grandchildren. One sister, Mrs Athel Baldwin of 'Brubri' is now the sole surviving member of the large Bignall family." (Manilla Express, 1/3/1957).[230]  
Children: (1)
 
Harry Bignall, born 1908, Manilla, NSW.[15,230] Died 1995, Newcastle, NSW.[230] AIF.[230] Married Rita Mantle, 1932, Hamilton, NSW.[15]
(2)
Leslie George Bignall, born 1910, Manilla, NSW.[15,230] Died 1918, Manilla, NSW,[15,230] & buried Anglican section, Manilla Cemetery, Manilla, NSW (8yo).[230]
(3)
Lindsay Irwin Bignall, born 1913, Manilla, NSW.[15] Died 2000 & buried Manilla Cemetery, Manilla, NSW.[230] Married Audrey Beryl Dawes, 1942, Murwillumbah, NSW.[15] Audrey born 1912, died 1943 & buried Methodist section, Manilla Cemetery, Manilla, NSW.[230] Married 2nd Marion McLeod, 1946, Manilla, NSW.[230]
(4)
James Towers Bignall, born 1919, Manilla, NSW.[230] Died 2003, Tugan, Queensland.[230] Married Ivy Burns, 1940, Wickham, NSW.[230]
(5)
Joan Bignall, born 1926, Manilla, NSW.[230] Died 1991, Sydney, NSW.[230] Married I. Woolfe, 1947, Manilla, NSW.[230]
(b)
Vennie/Veenie C. Irwin, born 1887, Newcastle, NSW.[15,205,206,230] Died 1933, Liverpool Range, near Quirindi, NSW.[163,230] Cause of death was a car crash.[230] Did not marry.[163]
(c)
Florence M. Irwin, born 1889, Newcastle, NSW.[15,205,206,230] Married George A. Tanner, 1913, Singleton, NSW.[15]
Children: (1)
 
Hilda May Tanner, born 1913, Waratah, NSW [15] Married Horace Arthur Wheeler, 1937, Scone, NSW.[15]
(2)
George A. Tanner, born 1915, Waratah, NSW [15] Died 1916, Waratah, NSW [15]
(3)
Ronald A. Tanner, born 1917, Wickham, NSW.[15] Married Lillian May Dodds, 1938, Hamilton, NSW.[15]
(d)
George Stanley Irwin, born 1891, Newcastle, NSW.[15,206,230] Died 1969, Goulburn, NSW (69yo).[163]
(e)
Horace F. Irwin, born 1894, Wickham, NSW.[15,205,206,230] Married Alice A. Zajonskowski, 1923, Chatswood, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(f)
Leslie Herbert Irwin, born 1/5/1898, Wickham, NSW.[15,205,206,230,376,377] Died 28/1/1985.[377] Bank clerk, 1916.[376] Bank Manager.[377] Member, Australian House of Representatives, 1961-1972.[377] Enlisted Australian Imperial Force, 9/3/1916, then residing residing Wickham, NSW, giving next of kin as father, George Henry Irwin (father), Fleming St, Wickham, NSW.[376] At enlistment was 18yrs 2months old, 5' 5" high, weighed 128lb, had fair hair & complexion, blue eyes, eyesight 6/6 in both eyes, no other distinguishing features & Presbyterian.[376] Previously served 4yrs as senior cadets, V.T.[376] Assigned, C Company, 35th Battalion, 30/4/1916, rank of corporal, service number 817.[376] Departed for England, 1/8/1916; promoted to sergeant, 5/9/1916; departed to France, 21/11/1916.[376] Wounded in action, 14/1/1917, Armenticus (sic), France; transferred 20/1/1917 to 13th General Hospital, Boulogne, with gunshot wounds to abdomen & both thighs, contracted scarlet fever 21/1/1917 & transferred 21/1/1917 to 1st General Hospital, Birmingham, England.[376] On 30/1/1917 his father was notifed by telegramme that his son had been wounded in action; on 16/2/1917 his father was notifed by telegramme that his son was recovering well.[376] Discharged from hospital, 2/5/1917; admitted to hospital for constipation, 16/5/1917, & discharged 29/5/1917; admitted to hospital, 30/5/1917, anaemic & excessively weak from injuries & scarlet fever.[376] Marched to No.3 Command Depot, 25/8/1917; transferred, 26/2/1918, to Engineers Depot, Dover, from Oxford; transferred, 19/5/1918, to AFC Depot.[376] Promoted to 2nd Lieutenant, pilot, 6th Squadron, Australian Imperial Force (transferred to flying corps), 1/10/1918, & found medically fit for flying duties.[376] On 18/11/1918 crashed his plane, was rendered unconscious but did not report same to medical officer, had no lasting effects according to a medical inquiry a month later.[376] Promoted to Lieutenant, Australian Imperial Force, 1/1/1919.[376] From 7/4/1919 to 7/9/1919 was in non-military employment with Dudbridge Iron Works, learning the construction of aeroplane engines, on full military pay as well as a transport allowance.[376] On 13/10/1919 his father was notifed that his son was commissioned into the British Army with the temporary rank of 2nd Lieutenant.[376] {Should this have been 1918?} On 28/10/1919 his father (then of Fleming St, Wickham) wrote a letter to the Officer in Charge of Base Records, Victoria Barracks, seeking the wehereabouts of his son, of whom he had had no word in some time; received a reply, 1/11/1919, notifying him that Leslie was still in active service serving in the Aust. Flying Corps.[376] Returned to Australia, 22/1/1920, and discharged, 11/5/1920, Sydney, medically fit & well.[376] Received the British War medal & the Victory Medal.[376]
  "Flight-Lieutenant Leslie Herbert Irwin. 35th battalion & Australian Flying Corps. Leslie Herbert Irwin was born 1/5/1898 at Wickham, NSW, the son of Mr George Henry Irwin & Mrs Amelia Irwin. He was educated at the Wickham Public School & entered the service of the Bank on 17/9/1914, at Newcastle West {Bank of NSW}. Enlisting in the A.I.F. in March 1916, Leslie Herbert Irwin sailed from Australia on 1st may, as sergeant in the 35th Battalion. On arrival in England he entered the Officers' Training School, but went to France with his Battalion in December, 1916. He was wounded at Armentieres on 14/1/1917, and was recommended for promotion to lieutenant. After some months in hospital, Leslie Irwin was transferred to the Flying Corps and went into training at Oxford University. he was attached to the aerodrome at Amberley as flight-lieutenant in the Australian Flying Corps when the Armistice was signed."[377]  
After being discharged from the AIF returned to employment with the Bank of New South Wales (Westpac today).[377] Resided, 1972, Blacktown, Sydney, NSW.[197] Did not marry.[197]
  "Leslie Herbert Irwin (1 May 1898 – 28 January 1985) was an Australian  politician. Born in Newcastle, New South Wales, he was educated at state schools and underwent military service 1916-30. Upon the end of his service, he became a bank manager. In 1961, he was selected as the Liberal candidate for the seat of Mitchell in the Australian House of Representatives. He was the last person born in the nineteenth century, the last person born before Federation, and the last World War I veteran elected to the House. He held Mitchell until his defeat in 1972. Irwin died in 1985."[378]  
"Father Figure injured in accident. One of Blacktown's best known 'father figures', Mr Les Irwin, is in a convalescent home following an accident. Mr Irwin slipped and broke his hip recently and was treated at Concord Hospital. He was later transferred to Lady Davidson Home, Turramurra, before returning to Blacktown to be close to his family. Mr Irwin, holder of the CBE, is now in his 80's. He is known to many for his escapades which go back as far as World War I. he altered his age to enlist and at the age of 17 was a Sgt-Major and later became a captain. He was badly wounded but after his recovery joined the Australian Flying Corps as a pilot. Mr Irwin came back to Australia and joined the Bank of NSW later becomming manager of the Blacktown branch. His long-time friend, Mr Fred Cowpe, who lives at Mt Druitt, said that Les Irwin had helped many of Blacktown's business people to get started by backing them through the Bank of NSW. Mr Cowpe said that Les Irwin had always been very public-spirited having helped with the building of Blacktown Hospital and the ambulance station. Mr Irwin left the bank to enter Federal Parliment as the Member for Mitchell, which he held for 9 years for the Liberal Party. Mr Irwin was also president of the Australian Flying Club and was the first president of the Newcastle Aero Club. He was also keenly interested in trotting."[Blacktown Advocate, undated]

v.

Thomas Irwin, born 2/2/1864, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215,230] Died 1/7/1947,[163,203,205,215,230] Dungog, NSW.[163] Buried Bendolba Cemetery.[203] Farmer, 1917.[10] Married Sarah Wheatley, 13/4/1909,[163,203,205] West Maitland, NSW.[163] Sarah, d/o George & Catherine, died 27/8/1927, Dungog, NSW.[163,205] No known issue.[163] Resided 1912, 1917, Bandon Grove, NSW.[4,10]

vi.
Henry Irwin, born 1/10/1866, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205,215,230] Died 1940, Perth registration district, Western Australia.[381] Married Mary Jane Crook, 19/6/1896, Newcastle, NSW.[15,203,205,215,230] Mary Jane died 1949, Swan registration district, Western Australia.[381] Resided 1903,1904,1905,1915 Chidlow's Wells (now Chidlows), Western Australia.[375,376] Resided 1917, Western Australia.[10]
Children: (a)
 
Thomas Irwin, born 26/6/1896, Newcastle, NSW.[15,203,230,376] Died 27/12/1977, NSW,[163,203,215] & buried Dungog Cemetery.[203] Engine cleaner, 1915.[376] Enlisted Australian Imperial Force, 7/5/1915, then residing residing Chidlow's Wells, WA, giving next of kin as Henry Irwin (father) of Chidlow's Wells, WA.[376] At enlistment was 18yrs 11months old, 5' 9.5" high, weighed 140lb, had a fair complexion, brown eyes, auburn hair, no other distinguishing features & Church of England.[376] At the time was serving in the 13th Engineers, Citizen Forces.[376] On 13/9/1915 was found unfit for enlistment due to testicular varicose veins, with the note that the condition can be remedied by surgery.[376] Enlisted Australian Imperial Force, 4/10/1915, then residing residing Chidlow's Wells, WA, giving next of kin as mother, Mary Jane Irwin.[376] Both parents giving consent, being under 21yo.[376] At enlistment was 19yrs 3months old, 5' 8.3/4" high, weighed 127lb, had chestnut complexion & hair, dark eyes, no other distinguishing features & Church of England.[376] Assigned, 7th training Battalion, 15/10/1915, service number 3856.[376] Transferred, 2/4/1916, to 9th Reinforcements, 28th Battalion, & departed Australia 5/6/1916.[376] Disembarked Marsailles, 12/8/1916, & transferred to the 51st Battalion; wounded in action, Abbeville, France, 9/6/1917 (gunshot wound in left leg & right hand); embarked for England 14/6/1917; admitted to Military Hospital, Tooting 15/6/1917.[376] On 25/6/1917 a telegram was sent to Mary Irwin (mother) notifing her that Thomas had been wounded in action.[376] On 2/7/1917 a telegram was sent to his mother notifing her that Thomas had been admitted to Tooting Military Hospital due to a severe gunshot wound to the right hand.[376] On 21/7/1917 a telegram was sent to his mother notifing her that Thomas' condition was improving.[376] On 4/8/1917 a telegram was sent to his mother notifing her that Thomas was convalescing.[376] Returned to Australia 10/9/1917 & given a medical discharge due to destruction of the radiocarpal joint in the right hand from the gunshot wound, discharged 9/4/1918, rank of private.[376] Was AWOL, Midnight 1/12/1917 to 9:45am 3/12/1917, forfeited 2 days pay, from 10:30pm 23/1/1918 to 10pm 24/1/1918, forfeited 1 day pay, from 10:30pm 16/3/1918 to 9:30pm 14/3/1918, forfeited 1 day pay.[376] On 10/4/1918 was awarded a pension of 20/- per fortnight, then residing Chidlow's Wells.[376] Awarded British War Medal, Victory Medal 10/11/1920, then residing Fosterton, via Dungog, NSW.[376] Was still alive19/10/1964 when a claim for repatriation benefits was lodged.[376]Resided, 1916, 1918 Chidlow's Wells, Western Australia.[376] Resided 1920, Fosterton, via Dungog, NSW.[376]  Married Edith May Newell, 1923,[203,215] Dungog, NSW.[163] Edith died 18/3/1949 & buried Dungog Cemetery.[203,215]

vii.
Mary Emma Irwin, born 4/7/1869, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205,215,230] Died 1918, Mosman, Sydney [15,230] Married James Dickson,[10,203,215] 1890, Dungog, NSW.[15,205,230]
"According to Isabel Bellingham nee Dickson, d/o James & Mary, the Irwin and Dickson families were not happy about the cousins marrying. James came over from NZ when he was 17 (in 1883/4) to accompany his eldest sister, Evarina back to NZ. Evarina had come over from NZ to visit her cousin, Mary Irwin (daughter of John Irwin & Jane Kirkpatrick) who had married Robert Leslie in 1865 and was living at Bendolba. It was through the Leslie family that James met the extended Irwin family and in particular Mary Emma daughter of Thomas."[397]
James, s/o James Dickson & Christian Kirkpatrick, born 1866, Auckland, New Zealand & died 1912.[397] Cause of death was a lift accident.[397] Customs Officer.[397] Resided Bourke, NSW.[397] Resided Tocumwal, NSW.[397] Resided 1912, Mosman, Sydney, NSW.[4]
Children: (a)
 
Evarina Towers Dickson, born 1891, Bourke, NSW.[15,205,230] Married Giacomo Delmenico, 1914, Sydney, NSW, NSW.[15]
Children: (1)
 
James Harold Delmenico, born 1915, Mosman, NSW.[15] Married Ivy Flack, 1940, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(2)

Jack Delmenico, born 1925/6, Mosman, NSW.[397] Married Rose Bennett, 1948.[397]
(b)
Isabel Christian Dickson, born 1894, Dungog, NSW.[15,205,230] Died 1979.[397] Married Andrew Downey Bellingham, 1917, Mosman, Sydney, NSW.[15,397]
Children: (1)
 
Frank Frederick Bellingham, born 1918, Mosman, Sydney, NSW.[15] Died 1984.[397] Married Nancy Veronica Bourke, 1941, Mosman, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(2)

Andrew Irwin Bellingham, born 1927, Long Bay, Sydney, NSW.[397] Married Betty Joyce Waterhouse, 1951,
Chatswood, Sydney, NSW.[397]
(c)
Frank Kirkpatrick Dickson, born 1896, Moama, NSW.[15,205,230,397] Died 6-9/8/1915, Gallipoli, Turkey.[397] Killed in action at Lone Pine, Gallipoli.[397] Enlisted Australian Imperial Forces, 13/5/1915, embarked from Sydney 16/6/1915, arrived Gallipoli 4/8/1915 and was killed between 6 and 9 August.[397] Did not marry.[397]
(d)
James Thomas Dickson, born 1903, Mosman, Sydney, NSW.[163,205,397] Died 1998.[397] Married Lola Stinson, 1927, Wagga Wagga, NSW.[397] Resided Wagga Wagga, Bega, Mosman and Bandon Grove, NSW.[397]
Children: (1)
 
James Brereton Dickson, born 1928/1929.[397] Married Shirley Line,1954, Mosman, NSW.[397]
(2)

John Dickson, born 1933.[397]
(e)

Aileen Mary Dickson, born 1907, Mosman, Sydney, NSW.[397] Died 2001.[397] Married Alan Holt, 1933, Mosman, Sydney, NSW.[397] Resided Lidsdale, near Wallerawang, NSW.[397]
Children: (1)
 
Ian Holt, born 1935.[397] Married Elizabeth Dekkers, 1958, North Sydney, NSW.[397]
(2)

Judith Holt, born 1937.[397]

viii.
Isabella Irwin, born 23/4/1872, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205,215,230] Died 18/12/1922, Hamilton, NSW.[163,205] Married Jack (John) Edward Howell,[10,203,215,230] 27/3/1901, Dungog, NSW.[205] John, born 1877,[205] s/o Edmund & Eunice, died 1957, Manly, Sydney, NSW.[163] As of 1980 the descendants of Isabella still owned the best part of the land that her brother, Thomas, had purchased from the Windeyer family.[10] Resided 1912, Newcastle, NSW.[4]
Children: (a)
 
John Edmund Howell, born 1902, Lambton, NSW.[163] Died 1902, Lambton, NSW.[163]
(b)
Thomas Irwin Leslie Howell, born 21/11/1909.[205] Died 13/11/1958, Newcastle, NSW.[163,205] Married Jennie Christina White, 20/10/1937, Dungog, NSW.[163,205] Jenie born 9/6/1912.[205]

ix.
Richard Leslie Irwin, born 11/11/1874, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205,215,230] Died 1959, Manly, Sydney, NSW.[163,230] Bank manager, 1917.[10] Married Gertrude Louise Lakeman, 7/2/1906, Harris Park, Parramatta, NSW.[15,205,230,339] Married at the home of the bride's parents by Rev. Henry Howard.[339] Gertrude, d/o James & Alice, died 1970, Manly, Sydney, NSW.[163] Resided 1917, Bombala, NSW.[10]
Children: (a)
 
Ian Leslie Irwin, born 1907, Millthorpe, NSW.[15] Married Marjorie Irene Dasky, 1941, Corowa, NSW.[15]
(b)
Gerald Leslie Irwin, born 1909, Millthorpe, NSW.[15] Married Edith Mary Watkins, 1941, Merewether, NSW.[15]
(c)
Lindsay Leslie Irwin, born 1912, Junee, NSW.[15]
(d)
Alison Leslie Irwin, born 1918, Bombala, NSW.[15] Married John Austin Donovan, 1950, Sydney, NSW.[163]

x.
Frederick William Irwin, born 28/7/1878, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205,215,230] Died 1949, Manly, Sydney, NSW.[163] Worked on the trams, 1917.[10] Married Florian Kate Kingston, 1904, Dungog, NSW.[4,15,203,205,215,230] Florian born 1879, Bandon Grove, d/o Samuel & Mary.[230] Resided 1912, Sydney, NSW.[4] Resided 1917, North Sydney, Sydney, NSW.[10]
Children: (a)
 
Frederick Kingston Irwin, born 1905, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW.[15,203,205,215,230] Died 8/5/1956, North Sydney, NSW.[163,205] Married Doris Pearl Harvey Jones, 1939, North Sydney, Sydney, NSW.[15,203,215]
(b)
Lester T. Irwin, born 1906, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW.[15,203,215,230] Married Ethel M. Faunce, 1933, North Sydney, NSW.[15,203,215]
(c)
Irene K. Irwin, born 1908, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW.[15,203,215,230] Married Norman V. Herfort, 1929, North Sydney, NSW.[15,203,215]
(d)
Marion E. Irwin, born 1911, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW.[15,230]

xi.
Frank Alma Irwin, born 29/3/1881, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205,215,222,230] Died 10/9/1946 (64yo),[163,203,205,215,222,230] Mayfield, Sydney, NSW,[163,230] & buried Bandon Grove Cemetery, Bandon Grove, NSW.[222,230] Farmer, 1917.[10] Married Amy Lydia Caldwell, 1907, Redfern, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,203,215,230] Amy, d/o Hugh, died 1948, Moss Vale, NSW.[163] Resided 1912, 1917, Bandon Grove, NSW.[4,10]
Children: (a)
 
John Caldwell Irwin, born 1910, Goulburn, NSW.[15,203,215,230] No further record.
(b)
Frank Caldwell Irwin, born 1913, Goulburn, NSW.[15,203,215,230] Married Dorothy Eena Cramp, 1938, Moss Vale, NSW.[15,203,215]


Entrance to Tillegra Estate
Entrance to Tillegra Estate
Image Google Maps
Bendolba Homestead, Williams River, c.1845
Bendolba Homestead, Williams River, c.1845
Image - Sylvia Rowe
Bandon Grove school, built 1882
Bandon Grove school, built 1882
Image - Family of Henry Bignall

Dungog Courthouse, Lord St, Dungog
Dungog Courthouse, Lord St, Dungog
Image Google Maps
St Peter's, Bendolba
St Peter's, Bendolba
Image 'nammo' [Flickr]
Leslie Herbert Irwin
Leslie Herbert Irwin
Aust Defence Force Academy
Patricia Powell & Leslie Irwin, Blacktown, 1972
Patricia Powell & Leslie Irwin,
Blacktown, 1972

Image - David Powell

Dungog is a moderate-sized Australian country town with a typically wide main street. It is located in a valley surrounded by rolling hills on the banks of the Williams River, 228 km north of Sydney. With a population of 2500 in 2004 it is essentially a cattle-raising, dairying and timber town and a service centre for the surrounding area. The name Dungog is from a local aboriginal dialect and means 'place of thinly wooded hills'. The first Europeans in the area are thought to have been stockmen in search of wayward cattle. The thick stands of cedar in the area soon drew timbergetters. One account concerns a cedar tree with a circumference of nearly 9 metres which it was estimated would yield 9 km of timber. The initial property grant was made in 1824. The first grant to the north was made to James Dowling in 1828. The land for a township to be named Upper Williams was set aside in 1830 but 'Dungog' was adopted in 1834. As a consequence of the bushranger activity in the area, including Captain Thunderbolt, Ben Hall's Gang, The Governors and the Jew Boy Gang, barracks and stables for police troopers were built between 1835-1838 (now the Dungog court house). A town plan was approved in 1838. A school was built in 1843. By 1850 the town was well-established and of good reputation. Timbercutting remained a central focus of the local economy into the 1860s when it was supplemented by a tannery, a tobacco factory and a flour mill.The railway arrived in 1911. Before 1888 Dungog was a very poor settlement, with no water supply, cars, telephones, hospital, butter factory, dairying, street lighting, footpaths, gutters, bridges or municipality. From the late 1800's these services were progressively established to service the planning district's population. The Census of 1857 indicated that Dungog village had 25 houses and a population of 126 people. By 1861 the population had grown to 458 people. By 1909, the Dungog area was serviced by a telephone network. In 1835 the Post Office was opened in Dungog. As the area in the vicinity of Dungog township was further explored, a large number of tiny settlements were established paricularly north of Dungog. Many of these exist today as comparatively isolated rural communities. These include: Bandon Grove, located 10km north of Dungog and originally part of Samuel Kingston's "Bandon Grove" estate, the settlement of Bandon Grove grew up on the confluence of the Williams and Chichester rivers. By 1880 the village had a post office, store tobacco factory, public school and Wesleyan Chapel. Bandon Grove prospered in the early 1900's due to the increase in dairying and citrus growing. A timber truss bridge was constructed over the Williams River at the turn of the century. Bandon Grove is today a picturesque rural community. Wangat, an Aboriginal name, meaning 'place where whispers are heard', located about 4 mile upstream from the present Chichester Dam. The development of Wangat was based on the discovery of gold 6. In 1881 a village of 80 people had grown and two crushing apparatus, one at Upper and one at Lower Wangat had been acquired, servicing 50 mines. Wangat was surveyed as a town in 1884 in a standard grid pattern. The village grew rapidly and boasted a school, hall and houses in the 1880-1890's. The yield of gold dwindled however and by 1902 only two houses were left in the village. The road to Upper Wangat was eventually closed to traffic. Salisbury, settled about 1836. Located north of Dungog at the feet of the Barrington Tops, Salisbury was an isolated community. A national school opened in 1875. Salisbury received a Post Office in the 1840's, which included a store. A Congregational Church opened in 1903. Principal activities in the area included dairying and cash cropping, and the locality is today a comparatively isolated and scattered rural community. Dusodie, an aboriginal word meaning 'place that is hard to find'. This scattered rural settlement is located north of Bandon Grove. Chichester valley was settled during the late 1840's and early 1850's. Chichester once boasted a school. The locality is now the most isolated rural community in the Dungog Shire. Underbank grew from the original estate of W M Foster, and is now a collection of properties. Wallaringa also derived from G S Waller's estate, once having a school and hall. Wirragulla was derived from John Hooke's estate, taken up in 1828. The locality once boasting a flour mill.[Sydney Morning Herald, Dungog Shire]

Wickham, NSW, 1906
Wickham, NSW, 1906
Image - Ralph Snowball [Flickr]
Hamilton Scots Kirk Presbyterian Church
Scots Kirk Presbyterian Church, Hamilton
Image Kevin Shultz, Heritage NSW
Manilla St, Manilla, 1936
Manilla St, Manilla, 1936
Image - State Library NSW

Wickham is an inner suburb of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, located 3km from Newcastle's central business district. Wickham, which was a Misspelling of Whickham, a suburb of Newcastle-on-Tyne in the north of England, means village by the creek. Wickham was proclaimed a Municipality 1871.[Wikipedia] In the early 1860s an area known as Pit Town in Newcastle NSW was an isolated community of slab and bark huts built by coal miners employed in the Borehole pit. At first there were not more than 100 miners in the district but by 1871 when the Municipality of Hamilton was formed, there was a population of almost 1000. The original settlers of Hamilton were mainly of Scottish descent and therefore it is not surprising that a strong Presbyterian Parish was formed. In 1882 the Parish gained independence as a separate charge and steps were taken to collect money for the erection of a new church on a site in Tudor Street. The design was based on Dunfermline Abbey in Scotland. The church was opened for service in 1887.[Scots Kirk]



1.1.1.2. James Irwin, born 11/7/1833,[4,5,10,15,186,203,215] County Armagh,[4] Ireland.[4,186] Died 2/7/1911,[4,15,350] at home, No.41 Mew Street, Ultimo, Sydney, NSW, Australia (79yo).[15,350] {The death certificate gives his address as New Street. Sydney Rate Books indicate it was actually Mew Street - see below} Goldminer,[4,10,350] grazier and JP,[4,350] company director, silver, gold & petroleum mining speculator.[350] Emigrated to NSW, Australia, 1837 with his parents.[4] Was heavily involved in the NSW mining industry; in the 1860's he was mining gold in the New England region, in 1876 he went to the Barrington goldfields and discovered the Mountain Maid Mine, in which he was the major partner until he sold out.[4] The mine produced 37,000 of gold in it's first 2.5 years of operation.[4] James then bought shares in several other mines and became active in the development of the gold, silver and kerosene mining industries.[4] In his latter years James was involved in the establishment of the South Pacific Petroleum Company in New Zealand.[4]
 
James Irwin, 1833-1911
James Irwin, 1833-1911
Image - David Powell

"James Irwin, Esquire, JP. Singularly blessed by a bountiful Providence with enormous mineral wealth, New South Wales may expect to be before long one of the richest countries in the Southern Hemisphere. Whilst her wealth remains hidden it is of little use to her, so that for us development and working all the skills and attention that can be given are demanded. Those who have made essay to win this wealth have done much to benefit the country, and they deserve all the commendation that they get. There is nothing so risky as mining, as one can know nothing beyond the point of the pick; all else is unknown. The finest ore that one sees may be the last of the lode, and each stroke may knock a hole through the bottom of the mine. So it is that he who makes money at mining is fortunate, and deserves the success he meets with. Such a one is the gentleman whose memoir is here presented to the reader. James Irwin, whose name is associated so intimately with mining industry of the colony, is one of those who came to Australia among the first free immigrants. Up to the time of his arrival it was the custom to send out each year from the british islands assisted immigrants, who were able to find money enough for their passage. For a while the ships conveyed immigrants, some of whom were free and some assisted, but by the year 1837 the ships began to bring the wholly free immigrants. It was in this year that Mr Irwin came to New South Wales, he being then but four years old. In that year 2685 person's came to the colony, which shows that even at that time it was looked upon as a favourable field for emigration. It was in the North of Ireland that Mr Irwin was born, in the year 1833, his father being a working engineer and blacksmith. The family came to sydney in the ship "Adam Lodge" commanded by Captain Main, and the people were under the charge of Surgeon Osborne. Of the passengers, the first thattouched Australian soil was Mr Irwin, so that he
Mountain Maid Mine
Mountain Maid Mine
Barrington Tops Top Spots
considers himself to be the earliest representative of the first fully free batch of immigrants. His father was at once employed by the Imperial Government, and worked for them in the iron trade for several years. All this time he was in sydney, and he was among the first to be put to work on the Darlinghurst Gaol. After some time, however, he found that he could do much better for himself by leaving the Government employ, and by working on his own account. He consequently looked round for a place where he might set up his forge, and fixed upon maitland, in the hunter river district, as the scene of his first independent attempt. He moved thither in the year 1840, and remained in that place for several year's. About 1847 he removed, with his family, to the upper Williams river, in which place he settled down. His son james continued with him for several year's, assisting his father in the business, and acquired a good knowledge of the trade. However like his father before him, he came to the conclusion that he could do best for himself in independent work, and made up his mind to leave his home to try his fortune on the goldfields. In pursuance of this intention he went to hanging rock diggings, on the border of New England, where he succeeded in doing fairly well. In 1876 he went to the barrington goldfields, and was there most successful, being one of the most fortunate prospectors in that region. Whilst there he prospected the Mountain Maid mine, which, when opened up and worked, produced in the first two and a-half years about 37,000 worth of gold. In the working of this mine up to that time there were but three people interested, Mr James Irwin and two others. Mr Irwin, having been the prospector, held more than one-third interest in the mine, and being anxious to devote his attention to other matters, he sold out to Mr Redman. After severing his connection with the venture, the mine was floated into a company, with which many prominent men became subsequently interested. Having acquired shares and valuable interests in several other paying mines, Mr Irwin found himself closley interested in the mining industry of the colony, and soon became an active power in the development of the gold and silver, and also the kerosene which is so plentiful in New South Wales. His undivided attention has been given to this business, and it may be safely said that much of the mining industry of the colony has been developed by his energy and enterprise. Mr Irwin is one of the promoters of the South Pacific Petroleum Company, situated in the North Island of New Zealand, where he and several others have been developing its resources for the last eight year's. Such has been the success attending his effort that the place has been so productive that it is known as the "Flowing Well". He is also largely interested in the silver mines of the colony. Amongst our most entereprising colonists, Mr Irwin takes a prominent place, and to him is owing much of the late developments in the resources and riches of New South Wales. Having met with phenomenal success in his speculations, Mr Irwin is now living at Forest Lodge, close to the University of Sydney. He has made himself respected and honoured by those amongst whom he lives, and on more than one occasion he has been requested to permit himself to be nominated for a seat on the municipal council, but owing to his time being so much taken up in his private affairs he has been compelled to refuse the honour. He cannot devote his attention and time to both duties - public and private. Mr Irwin married in East Maitland, Miss Jane M'Rae, a daughter of one of the earliest settlers in the north, and an overseer of the A and A Company (sic). The property he resides on is his own, and his house is one of the first erected in Forest Lodge. In 1887, Mr Irwin finding a quiet life unsuited to his character, re-entered business, and again interested himself actively in mining, which he still carries out. After a life of labour he is now enjoying an age of ease, having toiled in the heat of the day, and honestly has won his reward. His example is one to be followed by all who come after him, and he will ever be looked upon as a typical and honourable type of colonist. Mr Irwin was placed on the Commission of the Peace for the territory of New South Wales by the late Sir Alexander Stuart."[4]
 
Mountain Maid Mine
Mountain Maid Mine, 1800s
Image - Ann Hammond
James was a partner in the rich goldmine known as "The Mountain Maid", at Copeland, near Gloucester, NSW.[10] He eventually lost most of his once considerable fortune through bad investments.[10] The mine was first owned by Irwin & Gill in the late 1870's.[10] On 4/7/1874 James, along with Peter Poole, applied for a gold mining lease at Gulgong, NSW.[229] They took possession of the lease 30/6/1874.[229] Edward Mcfarlane was the surveyor.[229] On 15/12/1876 James Irwin, William Gill & George Hoare, applied for two gold mining leases at Barrington, NSW.[229] They took possession of the leases 10/112/1876.[229] E. F. Pittman was the surveyor.[229] On 6/2/1877 James Irwin & William Gill, applied for two gold mining leases at Barrington, NSW.[229] They took possession of the leases 1/2/1877.[229] E. F. Pittman was the surveyor.[229] On 3/8/1878 it was announced that "J. Irwin and Co, of the Mountain Maid claim, Barrington diggings, have finished crushing 90 tons of stone, yielding 1,280oz (of gold)."[350] On 18/1/1879 James & his brother George applied for a gold mining lease at Copeland, NSW.[229] They took possession of the lease 9/1/1879.[229] J. E. Hicks was the surveyor.[229] On 20/1/1879 James applied for a gold mining lease at Copeland, NSW, along with his brothers William, Thomas & George.[229] They took possession of the lease 9/1/1879.[229] J. E. Hicks was the surveyor.[229] On 23/6/1879, "Irwin & Co" were operating the Mountain Hero claim on the Barrington River, near Copeland: "Their shaft is sunk 50 feet, reef, from six inches to one foot, and seems to be getting thicker at the bottom of shaft, and the quartz in this reef looks rich in sinking, and they have about 16 tons at grass, which is expected to go from 4 to 6 oz to the ton. They are now putting in a tunnel to strike the reef, about 160 feet deeper."[350] On 27/10/1879 James displayed a number of specimens of gold bearing quartz from the Barrington and Copeland fields at the Sydney International Exhibition, taken from different levels in the Rose and Thistle, Mountain Maid, and Hidden Treasure claims.[350] On 19/3/1881 James applied for a gold mining lease at Copeland, NSW.[229] He took possession of the lease 9/3/1881.[229] On 25/11/1881 James Irwin, Henry Heron & John Tassell, applied for a gold mining lease at Copeland, NSW.[229] They took possession of the leases 16/11/1881.[229] H. O. S. White was the surveyor.[229] On 22/2/1884 James Irwin, John Johnson, Mr Ball & T. M. McWilliam, applied for a gold mining lease at Dungog, NSW.[229] They took possession of the leases 13/2/1884.[229] J. H. McEwan was the surveyor.[229] On 17/2/1890 James applied for a gold mining lease at Bulladelah, NSW.[229] There is no record of the lease having been taken up.[229] On 6/7/1895 James Irwin & Eugene Aaron Goldring applied for a gold mining lease at Copeland, NSW.[229] There is no record of the lease having been taken up.[229] On 3/8/1903 James Irwin & H. Cross applied for two gold mining leases at Copeland, NSW.[229] There is no record of the leases having been taken up.[229] On 27/2/1908 James applied for a gold mining lease at Copeland, NSW.[229] There is no record of the lease having been taken up.[229]
  "One of the most remarkable stories of the Copeland Goldfields is that of a man who not being over-enamoured with the prospects of a gold find, sold his third share to his two partners for 5. The mine developed into the richest on the field and is reputed to have yielded over 150,000 in gold. The man was Charles Doust, and the mine The Mountain Maid, of which the mining warden's report for 1879 said 'The most notable on the field, was discovered by Messrs Doust, Gill & Irwin in 1876. The first crushing of 82 tons in August 1878 yielded 15oz, 11dwts per ton and to date (31/12/1879) 925 tons have been crushed for a return of 7,664oz, an average of 8oz, 5dwts per ton. The greatest depth is 180 feet.' ...Dungog in 1845 was a prosperous town, of some 1500 inhabitants, and business and official centre for a large area. Gold was discovered at Bark Creek - as Copeland was first named - by cedar getters, Saxby Bros, and Bartlett in 1872. Alluvial gold was won in varying quantities over quite a large area in the next few years but the high production did not come until the quartz reefs shedding the gold were located. In 1876 the first lease was taken out and the first battery - erected by Messrs Driscoll & Watts - went into operation in 1877. In 1878 the total production of the field was 2300oz, which jumped sharply to its peak the following year with 10,015oz ... This rich narrow lode, or pipe, quickly petered out, and with it gold mining, except on a small scale, in the Gloucester district ... The records of the gold escorts confirm the fact that quite a large quantity of gold was won at Copeland in a short period of time. On August 3, 1878, an escort passed through Gloucester accompanying Irwin, Gill & party's gold to Stroud, being a parcel of 1340 ounces. This would be a considerable amount of wealth in those days. The rich finds made during 1877, 1878 and 1879 and the particularly high returns from The Mountain Maid brought Copeland into prominence. Unfortunately the high hopes formed as to the permanence of the reefs were not realised and commencing in 1880 a great number of disappointed miners joined the Temora rush and only about 12 of the 51 reefs continued to be worked. At its peak Copeland had a population of about 3000... Gradually the gold dwindled away and claims duffed out. Real mining ceased about 1908. The cedar houses disappeared and the scrub has grown down the mountain to hide the scars made by the miners." (The Mercury, 16/1/1967).[4]  
On 3/7/1880 advertised: "Notice. Owners of cattle, depasturing on the Tiligra Run, Williams River, are hereby reminded that for all stock depasturing on said Run after this date, Agistment, at the rate of Sixpence per head per Month, will be charged. James Irwin."[350] In 1882 (James Irwine, Esquire) was a provisional director of "The Grand pacific Hotel Company", registered in Sydney.[350] The company had captial of 100,000, in 50,000 shares of 2 each & was formed for "the purpose of purchasing a site and erecting a first-class Hotel, similar in character to the best hotels in Europe and America. It is unnecessary to refer to the long felt want of such an hotel in this city, the daily increasing travelling population experiencing the greatest difficulty in finding accommodation suitable to their requirements. It is proposed to erect a building containing 250 rooms, to be furnished throughout with every regard to comfort. An estimate of the profitable receipts and expenditure, carefully compiled from data furnished by managers of hotels, may be seen at the offices of the Brokers, showing an estimated profit of 19 per cent, on the capital contemplated to be called up. The management of the hotel is one of the most important matters which the Directors have to consider, but they feel confident in being able to secure tho services of a first-class Manager with assistants from America or Europe, where so many of the high-class hotels are conducted by Joint Stock Companies."[350] In 3/1883 was elected a member of the Hunter River Agricultural and Horticultural Association.[350] On 1/9/1883 a description of some of the stock on James' Tilligra Estate was published in 'The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser':
 
Tillegra Run, west from 160 Salisbury Rd
Tillegra Run, west from 160 Salisbury Road
(farm has since been subdivided)

Image  Google Streetview
"Following upon the fine seasonable rain of last week, we had four or five days bright and clear with light frosty mornings. On Monday it changed to soft mild cloudy weather, and at night there was a fine fall of rain. Yesterday (Tuesday) was cloudy, with some light spitters of rain, and today while I write it remains mild and cloudy, with every appearance of showery weather. Such a propitious season was never before experienced by the white man in this district, every kind of vegetation is growing admirably, all kinds of live stock are in high health and in high condition, the promising appearance on all hands appears to inspire the people with confidence in the future; all branches of business are more than usually active, extensive alterations and repairs are going on on the Underbank and Bandon Grove roads. But in spite of all that has been said there is nothing doing on the Stroud road, where it is so much more urgently required; it is inexplicable why this road, that is such a public necessity, is allowed to lie in such an impassable condition. As bearing upon the enterprise and progress in the district, I have lately paid a visit of inspection to Mr. James Irwin's stud of Clydesdale horses, at Telligra. He has got some half-dozen heavy mares, four of them pure Clydesdales, lately imported from New Zealand. He has two entires, Clyde Lad, a block horse rising five (by Muir Lad imported), a vary handsome horse; he stood here the past season, it is expected he will have a pretty numerous family next foaling time. The other is named Sydney, a new arrival; he was exhibited at the late parade in Maitland. He is four year old, a dappled brown or dark bay, with the two hind feet white and a white stripe in the face, he stands about 17 hands; he was imported from the Clyde into New Zealand when two years old; taking him all in all he is a magnificent horse. Both horses indeed are splendid animals, high-spirited, with fine action, and as docile as little children ; you may find their equals, but it would be hard to find their superior in this colony. The horses are stabled of course, but as showing the salubrity of the season the mares have run out all winter without any artificial feeding, and they are in high health and condition, and as frisky as foals. I saw them kicking up their heels and racing about the paddock like as many two-year-olds. This fine stud will be a great accession, for there is no question these fine entires will leave their mark upon the working stock of the district. We observe in the Mercury that some Normandy Percherons have been imported into Victoria. Perhaps it is not generally known that the working horses of Scotland are descendants of the French Percheron. Scotland had a miserably poor breed of horses previous to the French alliance. While Scotland was still an independent kingdom, and after the accession of William the Conqueror, the breed of horses was greatly improved both in England and Scotland by the influx of horses from Normandy. Mr. Irwin's black horse is the very picture of a pure-bred Percheron; he may be something heavier if anything, for of late years in the west of Scotland the system of breeding and feeding has tended to increase the size of the horse. But it is questionable if it be an improvement in their normal condition. The Norman and Scotch horses have no superiors for agricultural purposes. They are strong in proportion to their inches, and active steppers in the plough. When we have got a railway through the valley of the Williams, horses of the right stamp will be in request; people will be encouraged to cultivate the land with celerity. A man with a pair of horses of the right sort can turn over as much land in one day as he could with a team of bullocks in two, so that a good breed of horses for farm work will be a great advantage to the district at large. As far as I can hear the health of the district is highly satisfactory, and the weather is indescribably salubrious. There was a light shower this afternoon, it has cleared up now, The stars are shining out in a cloudless Sky. Dungog, August 21th, 1883."[350]
 
On 12/8/1884 Brown Brothers & Co Auctioneers advertised the sale of a Suffolk Punch stallion at Sydney Showground, on account for "Mr James Irwin, of Dungog".[350] {James was living in Sydney at the time but owned property near Dungog} On 15/10/1884 Brown Brothers & Co Auctioneers advertised the sale of 'Dandy', a "handsome brown gelding, first class harness horse, broken to all kinds of harness (driven by a lady, is remarkably quiet, and can be highly recommended)" at their bazaar, Castlereagh Street, Sydney, on account for "James Irwin, Esquire, of Dungog".[350] {see note above} On 11/5/1886 sold by auction the Tilligra Estate, a grazing property near Dungog, containing a homestead, various farm builldings & cottages, covering around 4000 acres (divided into two by the Dungog-Underbank Road) with frontage on the Williams River:
  "Important Clearing-Out Sale by Auction. Tilligra Estate, near Dungog. To Small Capitalists requiring a Compact Freehold estate. 2000 ACRES (more or loss) of well-grassed, permanently-watered, first-class Pastoral and Agricultural Land, Williams River District, close to Dungog, known as The Tilligra Estate, having an Extensive Frontage to the Williams River, and well and favorably known as the property of James Irwin, Esquire. For Sale by Auction, on the Ground, on Tuesday, May 11, 1886, at 12 o'clock noon.
Title Perfect. Brown Bros, and Co. have received instructions from James Irwin, Esquire, of Forest Lodge, Sydney, to sell by public Auction, on the Estate, on May 11, 1886, at 12 o'clock, the First-Class Grazing and Agricultural Estate known as Tilligra, containing 2000 acres (more or less) of Rich Agricultural and Grazing Land, with an extensive frontage to the Williams River, and also watered by creeks running through the property, giving a never-failing supply of water. The estate is highly improved by ringbarking, clearing, and subdivided into numerous paddocks by substantial split fences. There are two substantially-erected cottages, stables, loose soxes, stockyards, and other buildings; bull paddock, enclosed by stockyard fencing, and ring paddock for exercising stallions. Also, a small compact property of 2000 acres (more or less), divided from the Tilligra Estate by the Govemment-road from Dungog to Underbank, Securely Fenced and Permanently Watered.
Also, cattle. One hundred and fifty (150) head of quiet well-bred cattle, chiefly bullocks, In foresaid condition and fattening ages 10 head of pure Alderney cows and heifers. The prize Alderney bull Sir Garnet, bred by the Hon. W. J. J . Larnach, Dunedin. The pure Durham bull Duke of Brunswick 32nd. The pure Hereford bull Osear, from local stock. Horses: Several head of first-class heavy draught mares, and a number of draught colts and lillies, by imported sires. Several head of light horses, including some first-class saddle and harness horses. The prize pony stallion Chatterbox, and several other ponies. The coaching stallion The Earl, by Marquis of Cleveland, dam by Trump Card. The blood stallions And the well-known horse Sundown. Farming Implements, &c: Horse-dray, bullock dray, van, spring-cart, express waggon, buggy, plough, harrows, and other farming implements and tools, too numerous to particularise.
Terms: For the freeholds - One-half cash; balance may be arranged on liberal terms. For the stock, &c. - 20 cash; over that amount by approved bills at three months. Luncheon Provided. NB-The Auctioneers beg to draw the attention of capitalists and others to the above Sale. The Estate is beautifully situated, having a very extended view of the valley of the Williams River. It is only about seven miles from the rising town of Dungog, and within sight of the Bendolba Public School and Post-office. The Estate is approached by a first-class Government road, and there is mail communication past the Estate three times a week. The certainty of railway communication between Maitland and Dungog must make this property a really first-class investment."[350]
 
On 30/7/1888 was re-elected as a director & member of the board of the "Silver Star Silver-Mining Company, Limited" at the general meeting of shareholders held at the United Chambers, Hunter Street, Sydney.[350] According to family tradition James lost his wealth on "too many slow horses and fast women", he returned to to Copeland in the hope of finding more gold, but had no luck as the gold had all been mined out, his widow spent her last decade living in a slum area, dependent on food assistance from family members.[400] Married Jane Anne ['Jimannie & James' MacRae] McCrae,[10,383] 25/9/1878, East Maitland, NSW.[4,15,203,215] Marriage was performed by Rev. James Bonthorne, presbyterian minister.[4] James was a gold miner, residing Dungog, NSW, Jane resided Stroud, NSW.[4] Both previously unmarried.[4] Witnesses were Alexander MacRae & Mary Titcume.[4,387,400] Jane was born 2/3/1847 at Gloucester, NSW, and died 15/10/1924,[4,163,203,215] Balmain South, Sydney, NSW (80yo).[163] Resided 1882, 'Bleakbank', No.2, Parramatta Old Road (north side), Glebe, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[400] {Near present day intersection of Seamer & Arundel Streets. The area consists of terrace houses and a few free standing dwellings. In 1905 Old Parramatta Road, Glebe, was renamed Arundel Street - City of Sydney Archives} Resided 3/1883, Glebe, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[350] Resided 1884, University Cottage, Forest Lodge (near Glebe), Sydney, NSW, Australia.[350] Resided 11/5/1886, 13/4/1888, Forest Lodge (near Glebe), Sydney, NSW, Australia.[350] Resided 1890, No.2 Parramatta Old Road (south side), Forest Lodge, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[400] Resided 1891, No.2 Parramatta Old Road, Glebe, Sydney, NSW, Australia (9 males & 3 females).[400] Resided 1901, Copeland, NSW, Australia (2 males).[400] Resided 1901, No.49 Charles Street, Forest Lodge, Sydney, NSW, Australia (2 males & 2 females).[400] {Jimannie & probably the youngest three children} Resided 1908, No.41 Mew Street, Ultimo, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[400] Resided 1911, No.41 Mew Street, Ultimo, Sydney, NSW, Australia (a 2 story, tin roofed brick dwelling with 5 rooms, valued at 31 p/a, John Harris the landlord.).[400,401] {The property was vacant 1901} Resided 1914, No.41 Mew Street, Denison Ward, Sydney, NSW, Australia (a 2 story, tin roofed brick dwelling with 5 rooms, valued at 41 p/a, John Harris' estate the landlord).[401] Resided 1915-1916, No.41 Mew Street, Ultimo, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[400]

Children of James Irwin & Jane Ann McCrae:

i.
 
Annie 'Irwin' McCrae, 1/12/1865,  Monkery (Monkerai), near Dungog, NSW.[15,387] Died 1944, Ash Island, nr Mayfield, Sydney, NSW.[15,400]  Annie's death certificate lists her 'parents' as Ann [Anne] McCrae and James Irwin, prospector.[387] Illegitimate daughter of Ann McRae of Telligherry, Port Stephens, NSW & Thomas Cockrane.[387] Married Patrick Maher, 4/5/1886, Sydney, NSW (as Annie McK. Irwin).[17,387,402] Consent was given by Annie's mother, Ann Irwin.[402] {That is, Annie was under 21yo} Patrick born 1860.[387] Resided 1891, 1901, Ash Island, nr Hexam, NSW (Annie & children only).[400]
Children: (a)
 
Henry Vincent Maher, born 1890, Newcastle, NSW.[17] Died 1943, Balmain, Sydney, NSW (s/o Patrick & Marjorie Ann).[163] Married Mary P. C. Olsen, 1914, Liverpool, NSW.[163]
(b)
Jessie E. Maher, born 1891, Waratah, NSW.[17] Died 1946, Murwillimbah, NSW (51yo).[163] Married Alfred Charles Yeark, 1911, Taree, NSW.[163] Alfred, s/o John & Wilhelmina, died 1979, NSW.[163]
(c)
Hilda F. Maher, born 1893, Waratah, NSW.[17] Married Jack W. Sutherland, 1928, Narrabri, NSW.[163]
(d)
Amy Belinda Maher, born 1895, Waratah, NSW.[17] Died 1972, Newcastle, NSW (s/o Patrick & Annie).[163] Married William Wallace Gawn, 1921, Waratah, NSW.[163] William, s/o Robert & Isabella, died 1961, Wallsend, NSW.[163]
(e)
Walter Leslie Maher, born 1903, Waratah, NSW.[17] Died 1943, Newcastle, NSW (s/o Patrick & Annie).[163] Married Nellie C. Davey, 1931, Hamilton, NSW.[163]
(f)
Victor Dudley Maher, born 1908, Waratah, NSW.[17] Died 1943, Newcastle, NSW (s/o Patrick & Annie).[163] Married Jane Pinkerton Miller, 1940, Ryde, Sydney, NSW.[163]

ii.
Sydney James 'Sidda' Irwin,[383] born 2/3/1879, Glebe, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,203,215] Died 6/9/1944,[4,15,203,215] Balmain, Sydney, NSW.[163] Resided 1917-1921, No.41 Mew Street, Ultimo, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[400] Did not marry. Resided 1930, No.130 Mullens Street, Rozelle, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[400]

ii.

Duncan George Irwin, born 11/5/1880, Glebe, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,203,215] Died 8/1884,[4,15,203,215,350] University Cottage, Forest Lodge (near Glebe), Sydney, NSW,[15,350] & buried Balmain Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[350]
  "The Friends of Mr. James Irwin are respectfully invited to attend the Funeral of his deceased and dearly beloved Son, Duncan George; the procession to move from his residence, University Cottage, Forest Lodge, this (Friday) Afternoon, at a quarter to 3 o'clock, for Balmain Cemetery. H. Mason, undertaker, 74 Oxford Street. (published 29/8/1884"[350]  

iii.

Forest Irwin, born 12/6/1882, Glebe, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,203,215] Died 10/12/1959,[4,163,203,215] Auburn, Sydney, NSW.[163] Married Mabel Phillips, 1904, Newtown, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,203,215] Mabel, d/o George & Margaret, died 1952, Newtown, Sydney, NSW.[163] Resided 1918-1921, Severn Street, Maroubra, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[400]
Children: (a)
 
Sadie P. Irwin, born 1905, Sydney, NSW.[15,203,215] Died 1906, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,203,215]
(b)
Eileen O. Irwin, born 1906, Paddington, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Victor B. Brown, 1929, Redfern, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(c)
George J. Irwin, born 1915, Paddington, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Julia M. O'Sullivan, 1935, Canterbury, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(d)
Margaret F. Irwin, born 1918, Randwick, Sydney, NSW.[15] Died 1918, Randwick, Sydney, NSW.[15]

iv.

Victor Kirkpatrick 'Vic' Irwin,[383] born 7/6/1884, Glebe, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,203,215] Died 6/1933,[4,163] Redfern, Sydney, NSW.[163,203] Did not marry. Resided 1930, No.130 Mullens Street, Rozelle, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[400]

v.

Malcolm John Irwin,[383] born 22/2/1886, Glebe, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,203,215] Died 8/1947,[4,163,203,215] Granville, Sydney, NSW.[163] Did not marry. Resided 1930, No.130 Mullens Street, Rozelle, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[400]

vi.
Lily Maud Irwin,[383] born 6/8/1889, Glebe, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,203,215,383] Died 21/1/1950,[4,203,215,383] Balmain, Sydney, NSW.[163] Married John Henry Conrick, 8/6/1914, Newtown, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,215,383] John, s/o William & Wilhemina, born 13/11/1886 & died 16/1/1948, Balmain, Sydney, NSW.[163,383]
Children: (a)
 
Kathleen Maud Lucy 'Kitty' Conrick, born 1/1/1918, Sydney, NSW.[15,383] Died 2004.[383] Married Francis James Withers, 15/8/1940, Rozelle, Sydney, NSW.[163,383] Francis served in the Australian Army during WWII, serving in two tours & was killed in action in Papua New Guinea.[383] Had issue.[383]
(b)
Maureen Lily 'Maurie' Conrick, born 19/5/1919, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[383] Married John Edward 'Jack' Stannard, 20/11/1939, Rozelle, Sydney, NSW.[163,383] Married 2nd Samuel Shorrocks, 24/4/1960.[383] Had issue.[383]
(c)
Margaret Alice 'Maggie' Conrick, born 2/6/1921, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[383] Died 2/8/1994.[383] Married Neville Ross Smith, 1940, Rozelle, Sydney, NSW.[163,383] Neville born 23/5/1920 & died 17/5/1971.[383] Had issue.[383]
(d)
Dorothy Beatrice Conrick.[15,383] Died 1925, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[15]
(e)
Mary Helen Conrick, born 1/3/1931, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[383] Died before 2010.[383] Married George Graham, 13/11/1948.[383] Had issue.[383]


Abandoned gold mine, Copeland
Mountain Maid Gold Mine, Copeland
Image Eliot Garvin [Panoramio]
115 Hereford Street, Forest Lodge
115 Hereford Street, Forest Lodge (1870's)
Image Realestate.com
Interior, St Stephen's Presbyterian East Maitland
Interior, St Stephen's Presbyterian East Maitland
Image - Organ Historical Trust

Copeland, c.1900
Copeland, c.1900
Image - NSW Dept Primary Industries
Mountain Maid Mine. Gold was first discovered in the Copeland district by Mr Saxby in July 1876, at Back Creek close to the site of the present township of Copeland. Miners flocked to the area and the population rapidly increased to 1100, of whom 800 were miners. Their needs were catered for by four stores and three public houses. While some alluvial (creek bed) gold was recovered, the deposits were soon worked out and less than 2000oz in total was recovered. The alluvial miners, noticing that much of the gold was attached to fragments of quartz, began prospecting the surrounding ridges for gold reefs, which were quickly discovered. Within a year of the first gold being discovered in the district, a number of reefs were already being mined including the Rainbow, Centennial, Mountain Maid, Hidden Treasure, Lady Lizzie, Mechanics, Morning Star, Star of the South, Rose and Thistle and Lord of the North. During 1877 the extent of gold-bearing country had been proven from the Barrington River, through Copeland, to the Bowman River on the northwest, a strip of country about five miles long. At about the same time, gold was discovered in various other parts of the district including Cobark, Rawdon Vale, Boranel Creek and the Little River. The first gold lease taken up at Copeland was applied for 25/11/1876, and the first crushing machine, consisting of 10 head of stamps, was erected in 1877 by Driscoll and Watt on the Rainbow Reef. Rich finds during 1877, 1878 and 1879, and especially the high returns from the Mountain Maid Mine, brought the goldfield into prominent notice, and the year 1879 saw the industry at its peak. Unfortunately, the high hopes formed as to the permanence of the reefs were not realised, and by the early 1880's only 12 of the 51 reefs continued to be worked. By 1887 mining had virtually ceased in the area, the Mountain Maid being one of the last mines to produce gold. Today, very little of Copeland township remains to be seen. The Mountain Maid was discovered in October 1876 by Doust, Gill and Irwin, 1.5km south west of Copeland, the reef bears ENE by WSW with a slight underlay to the south, with an average width of six inches. To the end of 1879, 925tons of crushed ore had yielded 7664oz gold, with workings 180ft deep. To the end of 1886, the mine had yielded 8819oz from 1892tons crushed, an average of 4oz 13dwt per ton. "Gold Town encompasses one of the area’s most famous reefs of gold, the Mountain Maid Reef, which was first discovered by Messrs Doust, Gill and Erwin in October, 1876, just four years after the first Alluvial gold was discovered at Back Creek by two cedar-getters, Saxby and Bartlett. The Mountain Maid Mine, as it was to be known, has a horizontal entrance. A vertical shaft, located 395 metres in from the entrance, extends 150 metres upwards to reach the surface. This provides a natural ventilation system to the mine. Since the main productive period (when the mine yielded 417 kilograms), the mine has changed hands a number of times and has been worked intermittently until 1978 when the gold lease was terminated by the Department of Mines. In 1988, John Dale, with the support of Gloucester Shire Council and the local community, officially opened Gold Town to the public." The mine is situated in the valley of the Copeland Creek, surrounded by lush rainforest, including a magnificent stand of red cedars. Old mining memorabilia, including the steam engines used to power the stamper battery, are on display. A guided walk takes you deep into the hillside, following the main shaft to where the gold-bearing ore was extracted, before it was fed into the stamper battery, to be crushed so that the gold could be separated from the quartz and other impurities. The head stamper battery still operates. In late 2006, the first stage of a project to redevelop the Mountain Maid Mine Tourist Facility was completed. A replica of the original bridge that once gave access to the main mine shaft was installed, historic structures were stabilised and refurbished, and contemporary structures were removed. As recently as 2008 the mine was still open as a tourist attraction. Official total production from the 45 mines operating in the area was 1964kg of reef gold. Only five of the mines yielded more than 100kg, the largest being the Mountain Maid with 417kg. In 2001, with gold prices at a high, a development application was made for further exploration and extension of the Centennial Gold Mine, although nothing appears to have come of it.[Copeland gold deposits, Gloucester Advocate, Managing National Parks & Reserves, Gloucester Profile, Barrington Tops Top Spots]
  South Pacific Petroleum Company, Limited. Notice is hereby given that if the calls now due on Shares in this Company held in the name of J, J. Sanders (or Saunders) are not paid to the Bank of New Zealand at Gisborne, or to the Secretary at the office of the Company 34 Clarence-street, Sydney, on or before Tuesday the 15th day of March, 1881, such Shares will be liable to be forfeited. By order of the Board. H. E. Jopling, Secretary. The balance of the Unallotted Shares in the "South Pacific Petroleum Company, Limited," amounting to 9,500, are offered to the Shareholders in pro rata distribution, according to the number applied for, at 6d. per share, Fourth Cull paid, such applications, accompanied by payment, to be opened on the 20th day of March. H. E. Jopling, Secretary. 34, Clarence Street, Sydney.(Poverty Bay Herald, 8/3/1881).[379]
New Zealand. Wellington, Mondoy. The South Pacific Petroleum Company have shipped two and a half tons of paraffins wax and a quantity of petroleum to Sydney to be tested.(Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser, 18/8/1881).[380]
South Pacific Petroleum Company. The annual meeting of the shareholders in the above Company was held in the Masonic Hotel last night. The following shareholders, representing 43,218 shares, were present: Messrs Dufaur (Chairman), Weaver, Isles, Maude, E. K. Brown, Martin, Chrisp, Shelton, Whinray, Joyce, Smith, Ponsford, Robb, Craig, Keefer, Pollen, Teat, Rosie, Innes, Tucker and Tharratt. The Chairman said the business would be the reading of the directors' and contractor's reports, and the election of a new Board. Mr Isles then read the following Directors' report: "Your Directors have now the pleasure of making the following report on the operations of the Company since the present Board took office. The present Board was elected on 3rd February, 1885, a short time after the due date of the sixteenth call. During their term of office five general meetings and adjourned general meetings and thirty-four Board meetings have been held. The present bore had at that time attained a depth of about 250 feet. It had been undertaken by Mr W. T. Weaver under & contract entered into by him with the previous Board, then a Sydney one. When the present Directors commenced their duties about 760 was due to Mr Weaver. On the completion of this contract (which was for a depth of 1,000 feet) last month, the sum of 1,462 1b 8d was due to Mr Weaver, 2,137 18s 4d having been paid him in various amounts. When the contract was finished your Directors considered it advisable to enter into a fresh one with Mr Weaver for a further depth of 200 feet at 5 per foot. On this contract Mr Weaver has attained a depth of 100 feet, and it will be seen from his report that although trifling accidents occasionally occur, the work is going on as favorably as could be expected. In connection with Mr Weaver your Directors now wish to express their sense of the liberal, straightforward manner in which he has dealt with them from the commencement of their term of office to the present time. Mr Weaver's financial position with the Compauy is as follows : He has received in cash, 2,678 ; he has purchased shares amounting to 211 17a 6d ; and calls paid on his shares by the Company, 517 5s : or in all, 3,407 2s 6d, the amount still owing on contract account being 692 17s 6d. He is now a holder of 12,130 shares. Your Directors have made five calls during their term of office, which have resulted as follows : "Collected on 16th call, 723 2s 3d; 17th, 405 0s 3d; 18th, 430 0s 10d; 19th, 1,023 1s 4d; 20th, 1,074 4s 6d; 21st (now current), say 865; total 4,520 9s 2d. With the 21st call 8s 6d per share has been called up. The position of the Company is now on the soundest basis : the statement of assets and liabilities (shows over 5,000 credit balance. There it no bank overdraft. Mr Weaver will be paid his contract up to 1,100 feet when the 21st call is fully collected, and there will he a sum of over 300 to the good after paying every obligation. The depth reached is most encouraging, and as everything is in perfect order and work going steadily on, shareholders may now expect good news at any moment. On the third day of February, 1885, Messrs Dufaur, Shelton, Chrisp, Joyce, Innes, Ward, and Smith were elected Directors by the shareholders at a general meeting. Out of the above number Mr Joyce resigned his position, whilst Mr Ward ceased to be qualified. A fresh Board will be elected this evening. The retiring Directors will be eligible for re-election.  F. Dufaur, Chairman."
The contractor reported : "I beg to report that the present depth of tho well is about 1100 feet of which 1075 is piped. The strata I am now in is brown sand and slate stone mixed. A slight caving in of sand took place a few days ago, but I am glad to say I was easily able to overcome it, and the bore is in first class order. Slight indications of oil have been observed the last 100 feet, and I am in hopes of reaching the third sand every day. All the machinery and plant are in good working order. There are sufficient pipes to go down to a depth ot 1500 ft if necessary." Mr Shelton proposed, and Mr Maud seconded tho adoption of the reports. Carried. Mr Maude proposed that both reports be printed and sent to each shareholder. Mr Smith seconded. Many complaints had been made as to the insufficiency of information supplied to shareholders, and now as they had it officially it should be circulated. Mr Shelton agreed with the motion, but thought that every information had been given to shareholders that was possible for the directors to give. The motion was then carried. The balance sheet was read and adopted. Mr Joyce asked what the lease of the Company's ground had been put down at. The Chairman said it was not possible to estimate its value as it was only leased for mining purposes. Mr Whinray asked at what rate the bore was going down. The Chairman said the contractor was down a 100 ft of the last contract entered into, and was making good progress. In reply to Mr Joyce, Mr Isles said all shares sold had been paid for, and all Sydney calls had beon paid up. Mr Smith said he had a very important proposition to bring forward. He would propose "That the Board of directors in the South Pacific Petroleum Company, No Liability, be transferred to Sydney, and that the following gentlemen be elected directors : Messrs Wm, Fleming. J. Rossiter, E. T. Foley, W. H. Jennings, H. P. Tidswell, A. Blackett, and A. Forsyth." To old shareholders most of those names would be familiar as having been on the last Board at Sydney. The Sydney shareholders then only held some 7,000 or 8,000 contributing shares, and it was thought advisable to remove the Board to Gisborne. Some short time ago things got in a critical state, and the result was that the Sydney people stepped in and were the Salvation of the Company. They now held some 23,000 contributing and 5000 paid up shares. It was therefore only natural that they should expect to have the control of affairs. He gave credit to the Sydney people for the plucky manner they had kept paying their calls whereas in Gisborne they had, with few exceptions, been forfeited. Sydney was a large centre of population and, in the event of oil being struck, capital would be available more so than in a small place like Gisborne. It was evident from the way the Sydney people stuck to their shares that they meant business. Besides they (Gisborne shareholders) could safely trust the Sydney people with the management of affairs. Mr E. K. Brown asked whether the Sydney people had expressed a wish to resume control of affairs. Mr Smith said they had. He was only acting as a mouth-piece. The Chairman said it was only within 24 hours that any of the Directors had heard of the proposition. Mr Isles had only showed them a letter and proxies from the Sydney shareholders. They (the Gisborne people) would be outvoted as the Sydney people had more shares. Mr Whinray thought if there were any document received it should come before the meeting. The Chairman said the letter had not been received by the Board. Mr Maude seconded the motion. Though he would like to see the control of affairs in Gisborne, it was only fair that Sydney could now resume control as they had more votes than the Gisborne shareholders. If oil was struck everyone would get the benefit of it just the same. Mr Whinray protested against the motion, as it was being made on the bald assertion of a shareholder. The Chairman said the meeting could not demand the production of a private letter. Mr Shelton was sorry to hear the proposition brought forward. When the Board took office the Sydney people had lost faith in the undertaking. It was due to the present Board that there was a Company now. If the Board had not acted as they had done the Sydney people would never have taken up their shares. It had always been held that the affairs of the Company could not be carried on properly when the head office was at such a distance. He would propose as an amendment, "That Messrs Dufaur, Shelton, Smith, Chrisp, Innes.E. K. Brown and C. P. Davis be elected Directors." He thought it would be most unwise to change the place of control when they might hear at any moment that they had struck oil. The Chairman said Mr Weaver held proxies for 33,000 shares. He would not allow himself to be nominated when he would only get one vote out of fifty. Mr Whinray again protested against the proposition being put unless the letter sent from Sydney was produced. He did not object to the proposed Sydney Board. Mr Isles said the communication was a private one, and he objected to show it. Mr Brown thought notice of motion should be given for such a sweeping I change. Mr Whinray said they had had a great fight to get the Board transferred to Gisborne, and now it was wanted to transfer it to Sydney again. Dr Pollen supported the appointment of tho Sydney directors as being fair and just. Mr Brown seconded the amendment. Mr Tales objected to Mr Brown taking any part in the proceedings, as his name was not on the register. Mr Whinray said the whole affair was most extraordinary. The word from Sydney might be bogus. The Chairman stated that Mr Weaver had intimated he would vote for the names proposed by Mr Smith. Several members then said it was no use discussing tho question as the present Board had got its "Happy despatch." Mr Whinray said it was about as easy a wipe out of existence as he had ever heard of. (Laughter. ) Mr Joyce here made a number of charges against the Directors, which where answered by Mr Shelton. Mr Joyce said there was too much tiddleywinking, and some of the Directors had acted illegally. In expressing his condemnation of the conduct of the Directors, Mr Joyce quoted Byron to one of the members who happened to smile at him. Mr Shelton said Mr Smith was not entitled to vote as he owed calls to the Company. Mr Smith denied this, instead of which he contended that the company owed him money over his recent trip to Australia. As there was no seconder to Mr Shelton's amendment, Mr Smith's motion was carried. On the motion of Mr Maud, seconded by Mr Smith, Messrs C. D. Best and A. G. Murcutt (two Sydney men) were elected auditors. On the motion of Mr Maud a cordial vote of thanks was given to the outgoing Board of Directors. Mr Joyce moved that tenders be called for printing the reports. Mr Isles said he had intended to give Mr Joyce half the work but he supposed Mr Joyce wanted all. Motion carried.(Poverty Bay Herald, 16/4/1886).[379]
The South Pacific Petroleum Company. Sydney, 7th November. The annual meeting of the South Pacific Petroleum Company has been further adjourned for three weeks, pending the receipt of a report as to the progress of the work at Gisborne. Gisborne, This Day. Mr. Weaver, working manager of the South Pacific Petroleum Company, who recently returned from America, proceeded to the oil springs yesterday to make preparation for testing the supply of oil in the well. When all is ready he will invite the share-holders, the public, and the press to be present. The trial will most probably take place next week.(Evening Post, 8/11/1888).[379]
Gisborne, Friday. The local directors of the South Pacific Petroleum Company report having visited the well where the pipes were down the hole clean 1343 feet of depth. The Sydney board let a contract for boring to a depth of 1376 feet.(Hawkes Bay Herald, 31/5/1890).[379]
 
St Stephen's Presbyterian, East Maitland. An earlier brick church building in the Gothic style with a square crenellated tower suffered in the great flood of 1893 and a new church was built on higher ground and opened on 16/7/1938. Constructed in brick in a contemporary Gothic idiom, the building incorporates a square tower flanking the entrance porch. The above photograph is of the interior of the earlier church.[Organ Historical Trust] Forest Lodge is a small, inner-city suburb of Sydney, immediately to the west of Glebe. Forest Lodge was named after a house built in the area in 1836 by Ambrose Foss. The house stood on the present site of 208-210 Bridge Road until it was demolished in 1912. A local pub, also called “Forest Lodge” is one of the few remaining watering holes of the 1850's still operating. Developed mainly in the Victorian era, a predominance of single and double storey row houses follow the contours of the low hills, stepping down in steep grades, and a few grander terraces built on the higher elevations.[Wikipedia, Harris Partners] The address 41 Mew Street, Ultimo, no longer exists and is today occupied by the campuses of the University of Technology and the Sydney TAFE. The location of James' residence in Forest Lodge is unknown - there is no record of "University Cottage" apart from material concerning James. There are few surviving free-standing homes in Forest Lodge from the time James settled there - most surviving period dwellings are terraces and it is doubtful that someone with James' social & financial standing would have been living in a 'mere' terrace. 115 Hereford Street is a sandstone 'cottage' built in the 1870's (the right time period) and currently set on 525 square metres of land (possibly once larger).[Realestate.com]
  "Early Application for the Very Few Remaining Shares is Necessary. Prospectus of the Silver Star Silver-Mining Company, Limited. Silverton, NSW.
Capital : 30,000, in 36,000 Shares of 1 each. 24,000 Shares, paid-up to 18s per Share, will be retained by the present proprietors as payment for the property. 12,000 Shares, as paid-up to 9s per Share, are now offered to the Public an the following terms, viz. :-1s per Share on Application, 1s per Share on Allotment ; the Balance of 7s per Share (to bring them up to the same value as the Proprietors' Shares) in calls as required, not exceeding 6d per Share per month. Contributing shares will be on the same footing, with regard to dividends, as the proprietary shares. The whole of the money raised on shares now offered to the publie will be placed to the credit of the Company, less the usual charges for brokerage, &c, &c.
Provisional Directors: J. J. Curran, Esq., United-chambers, Sydney; James Irwin, Esq., Forest Lodge, Sydney; A. R. Gregory, Esq., 122A, Elizabeth-street, Sydney; F. F. Cox, Esq.. United-chambers, Sydney; H. F.Helder, Esq., Jamieson-street, Sydney; H. Margules, Esq., Sydney. Bankers: Commercial Banking Company of Sydney. Solicitors: Messrs. Robberds and Son. Brokers: Burrell, Shaw, and Co., 130, Pitt-street, Sydney; Stevens and Dixon. 32, Collins-street West, Melbourne; M. Kingsborough, Gladstone-chambers, Pirie-street, Adelaide. Legal Manager: Walter Burrell, 130, Pitt-street, Sydney.
This Company is being formed for the purpose of acquiring and further developing Mineral Lease 2098, of about 33 acres, situated in the parish of Stephen, county of Yancowinna, New South Wales. The property lies not far from the "Day Dream," from which it runs in a line with that mine and the celebrated "Uno," recently floated so successfully under the name of the "Barrier Chief," and from which ores have been found to assay as high as 2300oz. of silver to the ton. Ore taken from the northern boundary, from an underlay which runs right through our property, has assayed as high as 1275oz, 6dwt. 3gr. of silver to the ton. Several lodes are traced through the ground, and already cuttings, trenches, and a shaft have been made, and show the valuable extent of the lodes, from which assays have been highly satisfactory, from 71oz. up to 191oz, 18dwt, 8gr. to the ton. Ore taken from the underlay of a lode which appears to be similar to, and probably a continuation of, the "Hen and Chickens," shows carbonate of copper, containing argentiferous chromate of lead, which has also assayed extremely well. The proprietors have the utmost confidence in this property. They do not ask any cash for themselves, they only desire the public to assist them in developing the mine to the fullest extent, and they confidently recommend this as one of the best investments on tim Day Dream side of the Barrier. The subjoined reports will testify to the value of the mine.
To the Proprietor, Silver Star S. L. Mine.
Gentlemen, Acting under your instructions, I have visited and made a careful examination of your property, and now respectfully submit the following report: It is situated in the Parish of Stephen, County of Yancowinna, about half-a-mile in a southerly direction from The Day Dream S. L. Mine. It consists of one block of 40 acres extent, being Mineral Lease 2098 (surveyed portion No. 75). The course of the lode is north-east and south-west, with a south-easterly underlay. The outcrop on surface is small, but well defined. Near the south-west boundary of your property a down-right shaft has been sunk 20ft. At this depth the lode was met with, and followed on the underlay for a distance of 20ft. The lode formation is 2ft. wide, carrying 3 to 4in. of nice-looking ore. A number of pits und costren holes havo been sunk on various parts of the lode, exposing seams or veins of good ore, and it is my opinion that on sinking, you will meet with a rich lode of silver lead ore. The formation of the lode, though small is regular and well defined, the walls being smooth, and giving every promise of going down to an unlimited depth. In conclusion, I can confidently recommend this property as a good investment, and with development should become payable.
I am, yours faithfully, (Signed) Chas. H. Wilson, Manager U.S.L. Mining Co, Limited.
Gentlemen, Acting under instructions, I have made a careful inspection of the Silver Star Mine in the parish of Stephen, county Yancowinna, and comprising about 40 acres, and is numbered 2098, M.L.75. You have a strong and healthy looking lode traversing the whole length of the claim bearing about NE and SW to a depth of some 35ft a shaft has been sunk, and having the lode all the way of a very promising character, and carring silver in the iron and gossan connected therewith I would recommend that this shaft be sunk another 35 or 40 ft, firmly believing you will be amply rewarded by so doing. There are several other pits, shafts, and trenches all exposing the lode, and elsewhere of a most promising charatter. A dike crosses the lode near the brow of the hill I would recommend that you sink a shaft near it, as at this place the whole formation is larger and carries more iron, and is on the same line as the Hen and Chickens and Day Dream. I firmly believe by the outlay of a small amount of capital, resuits equal to those obtained in these mines will be obtained, esspecially seeing the character of the lodes are at the surface the same, as are also the strata and dykes. Towards your western boundory is another lode, about 6ft. wide. Near your north boundary a shaft has been sunk on Block 23, (survey portion) some 30ft,, and carries good chlorides throughout. I would recommend that a shaft be sunk on the course of the lode, somewhere about the centre of the claim. Looking at the property as a whole, I consider it a first-class speculation, and one that, if properly prospected, is likely to make a successful and lasting mine.
I am, Gentlemen, yours faithfully, (Signed) Charles Thomas.
Gentlemen, I have carefully inspected your property known as the Silver Star; it comprises an area of about 10 acres more or less, and is situated about eight miles NE from Silverton and 500 yards south from the Day Dream, in the parish of Stephen, county of Yancowinna. I found a very strong lode formation traversing the claim, its course being N.E. by S.W., on this a shaft has been sunk to a depth of 35 feet. From all appearances, upon deeper sinking, a higher class ore will be met with here. The lode has been opened up along its course by prospecting pits and costeening. On the top of the hill it shows itself much larger and stronger than in any other part, varying from 30 to 100 feet. Here operations ure being carried on in sinking a shaft in the centre of the lode, and from surface indications, good results may shortly be expected. The lode can be traced for two or three miles, and has been opened on other mines, which proves it to be a champion lode running right through the country. Gentlemen, it is my belief that, by the expenditure of a little capital, your mine will prove a valuable mining property.
I am, Gentlemen, Yours faithfully, (Signed) Benjamin Worth, M.E.The Sydney Morning Herald, 13/4/1888"[350]
 
   
James Irwin
James Irwin
Image - Ann Hammond
James Ann Irwin nee McRae
James Ann Irwin nee McRae
Image - Ann Hammond
James Irwin & son (possibly Forest)
James Irwin & son (Forest?)
Image - Ann Hammond
Mountain Maid Mine, 1880s
Mountain Maid Mine, 1880s
Image - Ann Hammond
       
  

1.1.1.3. John Irwin,[210,211] born 1835,[4,5,10,186,203,204,210,215,230] County Londonderry,[4] Ireland.[186,204,210] {A compiled genealogy in [4] gives place of birth as "Derry" (sic), presumably either the city of Londonerry or the county} Died 14/5/1897, Bendolba, NSW (63yo).[4,10,15,203,215] {According to [230] died Munni & buried Bendolba. [230] does not give a DOD, just the location & does contain errors on the Irwin family}
  "John Irwin 14/5/1897. Death on Friday morning last Mr John Irwin of Bendolba, passed peacefully over to the great majority after a long and painful illness. The late Mr Irwin was born in County Tyrone Ireland, in 1835 and came to the colony with his parents when he was 4 years old. He had resided at Bendolba for very many years and was highly respected. He was 63 years of age and his remains were interred in the Bendolba cemetery the Rev D. Baird conducting the burial service. The funeral was largely attended. He leaves a grown up family of 4 sons and 2 daughters to mourn their loss."(Dungog Chronicle, 18/5/1897).[4,230]  
Emigrated to NSW, Australia in 1837 with his parents.[4,211] Learnt the blacksmithing trade from his father & worked the family farm.[10] Blacksmith, 1898.[204] Farmer, 1857,1860.[204,210,354] In August, 1862, donated 10s to the 13 subscription list of the "Distress in the Manufacturing Districts" appeal, collected by Dr. McKinlay, Dungog, NSW.[344] On 28/7/1874 John applied for a gold mining lease at Gulgong, NSW.[229] He took possession of the lease 27/7/1874.[229] Edward McFarlane was the surveyor.[229] On 9/2/1878 John along with William Atkins, A. C. Thompson & Mr Hunter applied for 2 gold mining leases at Barrington, NSW.[229] They took possession of the leases 2/2/1878.[229] E. F. Pittman was the surveyor.[229] On 6/5/1878 John along with Thomas Hall applied for 2 gold mining leases at Barrington, NSW.[229] They took possession of the leases 29/4/1878.[229] E. F. Pittman was the surveyor.[229] On 26/10/1880 was awarded the Post Office mail contract for Bendolba & Underbank for the following 3 years (1881-1883), twice a week on horseback, at a salary of 27 per annum.[344] On 11/12/1883, John Irwin, of Telegra (sic), Dungog, farmer, was declared bankrupt,[225,344] with liabilities of 192 10s and assets of 36, Mr Lloyd was the official assingee.[344] Married Elizabeth Towers,[210,211] 30/11/1857, Bendolba (near Dungog), NSW, Australia,[4,10,15,203,204,215,230,354] by Thomas Stirton.[354] Both previously unmarried, Elizabeth resided Bendolba & John resided Tillegra, NSW.[354] Witnesses Thomas Irwin & Thomas Towers.[354] Elizabeth, d/o Thomas Towers & Elizabeth Fletcher,[354] born 1832, Liverpool, England,[210,230] baptised 10/9/1832, St Peter, Liverpool, England,[230] and died 17/1/1904, Tilligra, NSW (72yo).[4,10,15,203,204,211] John and Elizabeth are buried at Bendolba Church of England Cemetery, NSW.[4,10]
  "Elizabeth Irwin, 17/1/1904. Death on Sunday afternoon last at her residence, at Telligra, the widow of the late Mr John Irwin passed peacefully away, the cause of death being an affection of the heart, from which the deceased lady had been suffering for some time past. The late Mrs Irwin, who was of a kindhearted disposition, was 70 years of age, and leaves a grown up family of 4 sons and 2 daughters to mourn their loss, and to them we extend our sincere sympathy. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon and was attended by a large number of relatived and friends, the remains of the deceased being interred in the Church of England cemetery at Bendolda, the Rev F. A. Cadell officiating at the grave."(Dungog Chronicle, 1/1904).[4,230]  
Resided 1857-1904, Tillegra, near Bandon Grove, NSW.[4,344]

Children of John Irwin & Elizabeth Towers:

i.
 
Thomas Irwin,[210] born 24/11/1858, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,211,215,230] Died 6/10/1951 (94yo), Goomeri, Queensland & buried Goomeri Cemetery.[214] Married Laura Middlebrook, 1885,[203,215,230] Dungog, NSW (listed as Irvin).[163] Laura born 1866 & died 6/5/1938 (72yo), Goomeri, Queensland & buried Goomeri Cemetery.[214]
Children: (a)
 
infant Irwin, born 1/7/1886, born Dungog, NSW.[163,203,215] Died 10/7/1886,[163,203,215] Dungog, NSW.[163]
(b)
Amy May Irwin, born 16/5/1888, born Dungog, NSW.[163,203,215] Died 1970, Goomeri, Queensland.[203,215] Married Edward Belmore Forster.[203,214,215] {Marriage presumably after 1917 in Queensland (the Queensland BMD CD covers up to 1917)} Edward born 1880 & died 7/4/1940 (60yo), Goomeri, Queensland & buried Goomeri Cemetery.[214] {Amy not buried in Goomeri Cemetery. Did she remarry?}
(c)
Raymond Leon Irwin,[203,215] born 1892, born Morpeth, NSW.[163] Died 22/3/1964, Goomeri, Queensland,[203,214,215] & buried Goomeri Cemetery.[214] Farmer.[215] Married Vera Ruby Dahler, 1924, Queensland.[203,215] Ruby, d/o William & Paulina, born 13/3/1904,[203,213,215] Queensland.[213] {The Queensland BMD index does not give locations} Had issue.[215]
(d)
Hazel Irwin,[203] born 3/9/1904, born Morpeth, NSW.[163,215] Died 26/121/1920 (16yo), Goomeri, Queensland & buried Goomeri Cemetery.[214]{ [203] gives 3/9/1904 as the DOD and does not list a DOB. This conflicts with the dates from the BDM indices and presumably the source has mixed up the DOB & the DOD}

ii.

James Irwin, born 1/8/1860, Tillegra (near Dungog), NSW.[4,10,15,203,210,211,215,230] {No apparent record of death for James in NSW prior to 1979, presumably moved to another state} James Irwin of Tillegra was the informant.[210] On 6/12/1892 James Jr applied for a gold mining lease at Dungog, NSW.[229] There is no record of the lease having been taken up.[229] On 2/5/1894 James Jr applied for a gold mining lease at Dungog, NSW.[229] There is no record of the lease having been taken up.[229] On 15/5/1894 James Jr applied for a gold mining lease at Dungog, NSW.[229] There is no record of the lease having been taken up.[229] Married Amy Harriett Middlebrook, 9/1/1895, Osterley Church, East Maitland, NSW.[163,203,215] {Oddly, the registration number in the BDM index for this marriage is 1935.19137, ie: in 1935}
  "In the Supreme Court of New South Wales: Matrimonial Causes Jurisdiction- Between Amy Harriett Irwin, Petitioner, and James Irwin, Respondent. To James Irwin, late of Swamp Oak, near Armidale, New South Wales. 'Take notice that the said Amy Harriett Irwin commenced a suit against you in this Honourable Court, and is applying for Dissolution of Marriage, on the grounds of desertion without just cause or excuse for three years and upwards, and take notice that you are required to enter an appearance to the said suit at the proper office of this Honourable Court on or before the twenty-fifth day of August next, and in the event of your not doing so within the time limit or obtaining further time, the petitioner will proceed and the suit be heard and determined, your absence notwithstanding. A copy of the petition filed herein may be had on application to either of the undesigned. Dated this twenty-fourth day of May, 1904.' Walter John Enright, Solicitor for the Petitioner, West Maitland. By his Agents, Vindin and Littlebottom, 14 Castlereagh street, Sydney. For the Registrar, John Geo. Leary. Chief Clerk."(Sydney Morning Herald, 13/6/1904).[348]  
Amy, d/o Charles & Charlotte, born 11/3/1871, Dungog, NSW,[163,203,215] died 1955, East Maitland, NSW.[163] Amy resided, 1916, Pitnacree Road, East Maitland, NSW.[376] Amy married 2nd Thomas P. Shannon, 1907, Sydney, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Walter Reginald Irwin, born 10/4/1895, Hinton, Morpeth, NSW.[163,203,215,376] Died 14/6/1973, Gloucester, NSW.[163,203,215] Labourer, 1916.[376] Resided 1916, Pitnacree Road, East Maitland, NSW.[376] Enlisted Australian Imperial Force, 25/11/1916, then residing residing Pitnacree Road, East Maitland, giving next of kin as mother, Amy Shannon.[376] At enlistment was 27yrs 7 months old, 5' 8" high, weighed 168lb, had medium complexion, grey-brown eyes, brown hair, had a 3x1" scar across right kneecap & another 2x1" scar on inside of left knee, Church of England.[376] Had 5 weeks prior service in mobilised force.[376] Assigned, 8th Reinforcements, 55th Battalion, rank of Private, service number 47142.[376]. On 31/1/1917 was discharged as medically unfit, not due to misconduct, due to a intracapsular fracture of the left femur, which occured 4 years previously at Gloucester, NSW, while skating.[376] Was found to be slightly lame, with movement limited in all directions in left hip joint, the condition being inoperable.[376] Married Emmie Melrose Graham, 20/9/1924, Annandale, Sydney, NSW.[163,203] Emmie, d/o Michael & Marie, born 2/5/1901 & died 9/4/1972, Newcastle, NSW.[163,203,215] Had issue.[215]
(b)
Marjorie Sybil Irwin, born 1898, Morpeth, NSW.[163,203,215] Died 1972, Sydney, NSW.[163] Married Carl William Street,[203,215] 1920, West Maitland, NSW.[163] Carl, s/o Lewis & Alice, died 1954, Mayfield, Sydney, NSW.[163] Had issue.[215]
* iii.

Jane Irwin, born 12/8/1862, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,211,215,230]

iv.

Mary Irwin, born 20/12/1864, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,211,215,230] Died 1942, Stockton, NSW.[163,230] Married Alfred Stanley Bignell,[4,230] 1891, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,211,215] Alfred born 28/12/1855, Bandon Grove, NSW,[203,211,215,230] s/o James & Amelia, died 1944, Islington, NSW,[163,230] & buried Sandgate Cemetery, Newcastle, NSW.[211,230]
  "The late Alfred Bignell, whose death was briefly reported in our last issue, was born at Bandon Grove 89 1/2 years ago, and lived in the district until a few years ago. He was one of the finest cricketers the Williams River ever produced. As a sportsman on and off the field, he was not excelled. He made twice as many centuries as any of our best players, said J. E. Irwin, a cricket contemporary Mr. Irwin added that he was invited to go to Sydney to play before the selectors who were picking the team to represent Australia in England in the Test series. After his active participation in the game, he was an enthusiastic adviser; and coach, and later on he was a spectator at matches every Saturday. He loved the game. The late Mr. Bignell was twice married. His first wife was Miss Jane Irwin, and of that union there were one daughter, Elsie (Mrs. Arch Duggan, Underbank) and three sons, Duncan ("Bun") (Maitland), Thomas (Newcastle), and James (who was accidently killed at Wangat Dam construction works). His second wife was Miss Mary Irwin, and of that union, there were five sons, Archibald (Hamilton), Frank (Hamilton), Victor (Islington), Walter (A.l.F.), and Stanley (Lambton). Deceased's brother, Joe, was also a noted cricketer. In their time there were on the scoring books the names of such players as H. S. Crowther, W. Potter, J. Hodges, "Cuffy" Webber, Ernie Elliott, Filshie, Bergin, Readett, Lowrey, Jack Watts and others. The late Alfred Bignell was not only a star batsman but a first-class bowler and a superb “slip” field. Deceased had been living with his son, Victor, at Islington for some years. His interment took place at Sandgate cemetery on Wednesday last."[230]  
Alfred married 1st Mary's older sister, Jane Irwin. Alfred was a dairyman & inherited James Bignell's farm, Willow Grove, Bandon Grove.[230] Resided 1904, Underbank, near Dungog, NSW.[230] Resided 1914,1916 Rocky Hill, near Dungog, NSW.[230]
Children: (a)
 
Archibald Raymond Bignell, born 8/10/1892, Rocky Hill (near Dingadee), NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Died 1962, Hamilton, NSW.[163] Enrolled, 1904, Underbank School, near Dungog, NSW.[230] Enlisted AIF, 1914.[230] Married E. Lloyd, 1923, Dungog, NSW.[230] Married 2nd F. Coles, 1929, Mayfield, NSW.[230] Married 3rd Freda Smith-Preston, 1949, Mayfield, Sydney, NSW.[163]
(b)
Frank Bignell, born 1895, Bandon Grove, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Died 1965, Hamilton, NSW.[163,230] Enrolled, 1904, Underbank School, near Dungog, NSW.[230] AIF, WW1.[230] Married Agnes Murray, 1922, Hamilton, NSW.[15,230]
(c)
Victor John Bignell, born 1897, Bandon Grove, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Died 1950, Islington, NSW.[163,230]
(d)
Walter Bignell, born 1900, Bandon Grove, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Died 1972, Sydney, NSW.[230]
(e)
Marjorie Mabel Bignell, born 1902, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Died 5/1/1907, Underbank, NSW.[15,203,215,230] Buried Bendolba, NSW.[230]
(f)
Stanley Laurence Bignell, born 1905, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Married Alice Notley, 1926, Wickham, NSW.[15]

v.

John Valentine Irwin, born 21/2/1867, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,204,211,230] Birth registered 15/4/1867, informant was John Irwin, father, of Tillegra near Dungog, witnesses were Margaret & Mary Irwin.[204] Died 19/12/1944 (77yo), District Hospital, Inverell, NSW [15,204,230] Informant was Olive McClane, daughter, of Brodies Plains.[204] Cause of death was chronic myocarditis & arterio sclerosis.[204] Buried 20/12/1944, Presbyterian Cemetery, Inverell, NSW, Rev M. E. Moyes the offiating minister.[204] On 15/5/1897 John Valentine applied for a gold mining lease at Dungog, NSW.[229] There is no record of the lease having been taken up.[229] On 17/7/1922 John Jr & Henry Willis applied for 4 gold mining leases at Inverell, NSW.[229] There is no record of the leases having been taken up.[229] Baker, 1898.[204] Hairdresser, 1944.[204] Married Ollera Low, 7/3/1898, Presbyterian Church, Uralla, NSW.[15,204,230] Both previously unmarried.[204] Both resided Swamp Oak, NSW, at the time of their marriage, Ollera living with her parents.[204] Witnesses Arthur Hannaford & Katie Low.[204] Thomas Johnston the officiating minister.[204] Ollera, d/o James & Elizabeth,[163] born 1876, Wandsworth, NSW,[204] & died 1956, Inverell, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Mabel Elizabeth Emma Irwin, born 1899, Hillgrove, NSW.[15,204,230] Died 1963, Tenterfield, NSW.[163] Married William Henry Rivers, 1923, Inverell, NSW.[15] William, s/o Thomas & Mary, died 1970, Tenterfield, NSW.[163]
(b)
Leslie James Irwin, born 1901, Hillgrove, NSW.[15,204,230] Died 1967, Inverell, NSW.[163] Married Florence M. Glynn, 1932, Inverell, NSW.[15]
(c)
Olive May Irwin, born 1906, Hillgrove, NSW.[15,204,230] Married Victor George McLane, 1937, Inverell, NSW.[15] Resided 1944, Brodies Plains, NSW.[204]

vi.
Emma Irwin, born 20/12/1869, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,211,215,230] Died 9/8/1952, Dungog, NSW,[163,203,215,230] & buried Bendolba Cemetery, Bendolba, NSW.[230] Married Alfred Thomas Atkins, 1/8/1890, Dungog, NSW.[4,15,203,215,230] "Orange Blossoms - Mr A Atkins of Canningalla, led Miss Irwin of Tillegra to the hymeneal altar on Wednesday last, the Rev J W Upjohn performing the marriage ceremony."(Dungog Chronicle, 5/8/1890).[230] Alfred, s/o Joshua & Jane, born 3/11/1868 & died 25/3/1930, Dungog, NSW.[10,15,203,215] Refer to the Atkins chart for additional information.
Children: (a)
 
Noel Atkins, born 1891, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215]
(b)
Harry Atkins, born 1892, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Died 22/5/1970, Dungog, NSW.[203,215] Married Catherine Edith Flaretty, 1921.[203,215]
(c)
Oswald J. Atkins, born 1895, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215]
(d)
Arthur R. Atkins, born 1897, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Prudence Redman, 1921, Dungog, NSW.[15]
(e)
Olive E. Atkins, born 1900, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Wilfred Jones, 1920, Waratah, NSW.[15]
(f)
Hubert E. Atkins, born 1903, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215]
(g)
Thomas Lester Atkins, born 1905, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Died 23/5/1982, Dungog, NSW.[203,215] Married Clorene Martin,[203,215] 1928, Dungog, NSW.[15]
(h)
Alfred R. Atkins, born 1908, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Cora Pardella, 1928, Dungog, NSW.[15]
(i)
Cecil Dene Atkins, born 1911, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Phyllis Merle Bishop, 1942, Parramatta, NSW.[15]

vii.
William 'Bill' Irwin, born 15/1/1874, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,211,215,217,230] Died 21/2/1951, Tillegra, near Bendolba, NSW (76yo),[163,203,215,217,230] & buried 22/2/1951, St Peter's Cemetery, Church of England, Bendolba, NSW.[217] Farmer at Tillegra, near Bendolba, NSW.[217] Married Nellie Muddle, 11/3/1903, Dungog, NSW.[4,15,215,216,217,230]
  "The marriage of Miss Nellie Muddle, youngest daughter of Mr H Muddle of Bendolba, & Mr William Irwin, the youngest son of the late Mr John Irwin of Tillegra, was celebrated at the residence of Mr F J Muddle of Dungog on Wednesday 11th inst, the ceremony being performed by Rev R Mowbray. The bride, who was given away by her brother Mr FJ Muddle, was gowned in white floral silk, with a fichu of lace & chiffon & wore a chiffon hat trimmed with feathers & orange blossoms. The bridesmaid, Misses Alice Muddle (sister of the bride), & Clara Flaherty, were prettily attired in cream muslin. Mr Harry Muddle brother of the bride, acted as best man. The many friends of the young couple recognising the occassion presented them with numerous valuable & useful gifts, besides which numerous letters & telegrams of congratulations were also received."(Dungog Chronicle, 17/3/1903).[230]  
Nellie, d/o Henry & Mary Elizabeth, born 27/1/1882, Dungog, NSW, died 17/5/1967, Tillegra, near Bendolba, NSW,[163,203,215,216,217] & buried 18/5/1967, St Peter's Cemetery, Church of England, Bendolba, NSW.[217] Resided 1935,1951,1967, Tillegra near Bendolba, NSW.[217]
Children: (a)
 
Eric John Irwin, born 1903, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215,217,230] Died 20/3/1980, Dungog, NSW.[217] Married Winifred M. Ready, 1928, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215,217] Winifred, d/o Oliver & Ann, born 1906, Bundarra, NSW.[217] Had issue.[217]
(b)
Kenneth Irwin, born 1905, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215,217,230] Died 1973, Newcastle, NSW.[217] Married Mary Frances Jane Bignell, 1926, Waratah, NSW.[15,217,230] Mary died 1969, Wararah, NSW.[217]


Farm & Rural view, Munni
Farm & Rural view, Munni
Image Simone Turner [Williams R. Valley Artists]
St Peters Church, Bendolba
St Peters Church, Bendolba
Image Barrington Tops
Farmland, Munni (typical of region)
Farmland, Munni (typical of region)
Image 'Cjewiss' [Panoramio]

Arch and Frank Bignall (middle row) in their Underbank School photo, 1905
Arch and Frank Bignall (middle row) in
their Underbank School photo, 1905

Image - Family of Henry Bignall
Bignall family home, Yarrow, Bandon Grove, late 1800's
Bignall family home, Yarrow, Bandon Grove, late 1800's
Image - Family of Henry Bignall
Mary Bignall nee Irwin
Mary Bignall nee Irwin
Image - Family of Henry Bignall

Boonara Street, Goomeri, Queensland, 1930
Boonara Street, Goomeri, Queensland, 1930
Image - State Library of Queensland
Grand Hotel, Goomeri, Queensland, 1939
Grand Hotel, Goomeri, Queensland, 1939
Image - State Library of Queensland
Swamp Oak Creek, Limbri
Swamp Oak Creek, Limbri
Image - Wikipedia

Goomeri is a town in the South Burnett region of Queensland. The town is located on the intersection of the Burnett, Bunya and Wide Bay Highways, 235km from Brisbane. In the 2006 census, Goomeri had a population of 488. The town's name is allegedly derived from the Aboriginal name for "broken shield". European settlement in the Goomeri area began in 1846 with the establishment of Booubyjan Homestead and Boonara Station. The Land Sale of 1911, when the town was established, was a defining moment in the history of the district. With the development of the the timber industry during the 1920s, the town boomed. New businesses were established, with all major services provided to a fast growing farming community. The Goomeri pumpkin festival, held on the last Sunday in May each year, attracts up to 10,000 visitors each year. Other industries in the area include beef and dairy.[Wikipedia, Goomeri] Limbri is a small village on Swamp Oak Creek, about 30 km east northeast of Tamworth in northern New South Wales. The population of the Limbri region in 2006 was 259. In 1961 the population was 121. The Main North railway line to Armidale opened in 1885 as Farquarsons Siding. In 1893 it was renamed Limbri station, but it has now been closed for a number of years. Some alluvial gold was found at Limbri. It is now an agricultural based village, with sheep and cattle breeding the main pursuits. Limbri public school opened in 1900 to serve the surrounding grazing properties and celebrated its centenary, but it is now closed. The general store that was there has also closed.[Wikipedia]

Underbank Congregational Church, Salisbury Rd
Underbank Congregational Church, Salisbury Rd
Image G. Christie [Churches Of The Hunter Valley]
Underbank Post Office, 1928
Underbank Post Office, 1928
Image - National Library Australia
Uralla Presbyterian Church (now Uniting), Hill St
Uralla Presbyterian Church (now Uniting), Hill St
Image Google Streetview



1.1.1.4. George Orr Irwin,[228] born 1841, Morpeth, NSW.[4,5,10,15,186,203,215] Died 1927, Ryde, Sydney, NSW.[15,203,215] Farmer, 1871.[10] George was employed for some time at John Wade's Cornflour Mill, Dungog.[10] On 18/1/1879 George & his brother James applied for a gold mining lease at Copeland, NSW.[229] They took possession of the lease 9/1/1879.[229] J. E. Hicks was the surveyor.[229] On 20/1/1879 George applied for a gold mining lease at Copeland, NSW, along with his brothers James, Thomas & William.[229] They took possession of the lease 9/1/1879.[229] J. E. Hicks was the surveyor.[229] On 4/8/1880 George applied for a gold mining lease at Copeland, NSW.[229] He took possession of the lease 26/7/1880.[229] H. O. S. White was the surveyor.[229]
  On 25/2/1881, "Notice to applicants for Gold mining leases - Notice is hereby given that unless the leasees execute and take delivery of the lease within thirty days from this date, they will be declared void: No. 460. Name, George Irwin and others. Portion No. GL 20. Locality - No.2 W. Mountain Hero Reef, parish of Boranel. Area, 4 a. Application No., Copeland, 324."[345]  
Married Annie Wilkie Alexander, 8/11/1871, Dungog, NSW, by Rev. Thomas Stirton, Church of Scotland (Presbyterian).[4,10,15,203,215] Witnesses were James Irwin & Laura Alexander.[10] Annie, d/o Thomas & Margaret, died 1906, Ryde, Sydney, NSW.[163] Resided 1916,  No.16 Knox Street, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[228] Resided 1881, 1882 Tillegra, NSW.[345]

Children of George Orr Irwin & Annie Wilkie Alexander:

i.
 
Edith Christian Irwin, born 13/6/1873, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215] Died 1900, West Maitland, NSW.[163] Married Frederick A. Ashe, 1896, Dungog, NSW.[4,15,203,215] Frederick, s/o William & Amelia, died 1933, Liverpool, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Emily I. Ashe, born 1897, Dungog, NSW.[15]
(b)
William G. Ashe, born 1900, East Maitland, NSW.[15] Married Lillian Hughes, 1924, Chatswood, Sydney, NSW.[15]

ii.

Alexander William Irwin, born 12/7/1875, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215] Died 3/3/1891, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215] Cause of death was valvular heart disease.[4,10]

iii.

George Leslie Irwin,[10] born 9/1882, Tillegra, NSW.[4,15,203,215,228] {[228] gives place of birth as Copeland, NSW} Died 1958, Lismore, NSW.[163] Carter, 1916.[228] Farm labourer, 1940.[228] Presbyterian.[228] Enlisted Australian Imperial Force, 31/5/1916, then residing residing 152 Liverpool Rd, Ashfield, giving next of kin as his father, George Orr Irwin.[228] At enlistment was 34yrs 8 months old, 5' 3.5" high, weighed 126lb, had dark  complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes, missing the top end of right middle finger, which had been amputated & Presbyterian.[228] Assigned, 19th Battalion, 31/10/1916, rank of private, service number 6335.[228] Embarked from Sydney, NSW on the 'Suevic', 11/11/1916, arriving Devonport, England 30/1/1917.[228] Transferred to 5th Training Battalion, Rollestone, England, 30/1/1917; admitted to Fargo Military Hospital, 16/2/1917 with influenza & bronchitis; returned to unit 4/3/1917; transferred to 19th Battalion in France, 19/3/1917; wounded in action, 5/1/1918, Belgium; transferred to General Hospital, Portsmouth, England with a gunshot wound in the thigh; returned to battalion in Belgium, 24/3/1918; wounded in action, France, 7/4/1918, to Shaly Hospital, Rouen, France 8/4/1918 with a gunshot wound in the right thigh & then transferred 13/4/1918 to Folkestone, England; Transferred to 5th South General Hospital, Portsmouth, gun shot wound to right hip & thigh, 16/4/1918; Discharged from hospital to No.4 Bam. Dept. (sic), Hurdoalt (sic), 31/5/1918; Sick in camp hospital with scabies, 28/6/1918; To O/Seas Training Bgde, Hundealt/Hurdealt, 14/8/1818; rejoined unit in Hawse, France, 17/9/1918; transferred to 18th battalion 11/10/1919; departed for Australia 19/6/1919, arriving Sydney, NSW 8/8/1919 & given a medical discharge.[228] Received British War Medal & the Victory medal.[228] On 12/9/1940, Leslie George Irwin, then resided Highfield, Glen Innes, farm employee, applied to have his discharge papers reissued, the originals having been stolen.[228] Married Myra I. Shields, 1923, Woollahra, Sydney, NSW.[163] Resided 1940, 'Highfield', Glen Innes, NSW.[228]

iv.

Leonora Georgina Irwin, born 16/2/1885, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215] Married Harold E. Dunlop,[10] 1911, Newtown, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,203,215]
Children: (a)
 
Elizabeth A. Dunlop, born 1913, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(b)
Norman J. Dunlop, born 1916, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15]

v.

Janet Wilkie Irwin, born 21/12/1888, Dungog, NSW.[10,15] Died 1892,[4,15,203,215] Dungog, NSW.[163]

vi.
James William Irwin, born 1889, Dungog, NSW.[4,15,203,215] No further record.


Cooreei Bridge, Williams River
Cooreei Bridge, Williams River
Image NSW Roads Traffic Authority
Cobark
Cobark
Image - The Tops Retreat
Cottage, crn Knox & Norton St's, Ashfield
Cottage, cnr Knox & Norton St's, Ashfield
Image Google Streetview

Wade's Corn Flour Mill was located at Coorei, near Dungog, and was in operation from 1878 until 1902. About 1866 John Wade established a general store at Dungog, then the centre of a maize-growing district. Since most cornflour was imported from Britain, Wade saw an opportunity to establish a local cornflour-milling industry. By 1878 he had engaged Mr McDonald from the English cornflour manufacturers, Brown & Polson Ltd, to construct a four-storey, brick-and-wood mill with imported machinery on his partner's land at Cooreei Bridge on the Williams River. Experienced labour proved a problem, nonetheless, local farmers profited from higher prices for their maize. When maize production declined with the introduction of dairying, John Wade & Co. moved its cornflour and starch manufacturing activities to Sydney in 1888. 'Wade's cornflour' was widely advertised and became a popular Australian household commodity. He retained control until selling out in 1908 to Brown & Polson. Although later bought by Clifford Love & Co. Ltd, 'Wade's cornflour' continues to be marketed.[AbeBooks, Aust. Dictionary Biography] The Mountain Hero Reef Mine was located in Cobark. "Copeland North. Tuesday. The Mountain Hero Reef (Irwin, McRae, and party), Cobark, has enlarged to 8 feet, at 80 feet in the tunnel, and shows good gold. It was previously very small."[Sydney Morning Herald, 24/9/1879] "The Mountain Hero reef, Copeland North, Cobark, has enlarged to 3ft. at 30ft. in the tunnel, and shows good gold. It was previously very small. Only the Rainbow machine is now at work. Both Hurley's and the Prince Edward machines are undergoing an overhaul."[Brisbane Courier, 8/10/1879]



1.1.1.5. Robert Irwin,[195,198,343] born 12/7/1844, Dalwood (near Maitland), NSW.[4,10,186,187,188,163,194,203,215] {Listed as Maitland on death certificate.[187]} Died 9/8/1901 (57yo), Sydney Hospital, Sydney NSW (late of Dungog, NSW).[4,10,187,203,212,215] Cause of death was epithelioma (cancer) of the tongue, 2 months duration.[187] Buried 11/8/1901,[10] Section C, plot 29, Presbyterian Section, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW,[410] by Rev. J. Osborn.[187] Robert's funeral card read "In Loving Remembrance of my Dear Husband Robert Irwin. Died August 9, 1901, aged 57 years. Farewell, dear wife, farewell. Adieu to thee, adieu. And you my dearly loved ones all, Farewell, farewell to you. Though I am gone, and you are left To tread this vale alone, We'll hope to meet again in heaven With Christ before God's throne. Deeply Regretted."[212] Farmer.[4,188,198] Farmer, 1866, 1875, 1884, 1901.[4,187,193,194] On 9/7/1894 Robert applied for a gold mining lease at Dungog, NSW.[229] There is no record of the lease having been taken up.[229] Married Louisa Atkins,[195,198] 21/12/1866, Canningalla (near Dungog), NSW.[4,10,15,187,188,192,193,194,203,215] Officiated by Rev. Joseph Monahan according to the rites of the Wesleyan Church.[193] Witnesses were Joseph Atkins and Eliza Jane Curran.[193] Both previously unmarried.[193] At the time of the marriage Robert resided Tillegra & Louisa resided Canningalla.[193] Louisa was a housekeeper, 1866.[193] Louisa was born 25/8/1849, Canningalla (near Dungog), NSW,[4,10,188,203,215] died 14/5/1910, Maitland Hospital, East Maitland, NSW (60yo),[4,10,15,192,197,203,207,215] & buried 16/5/1910, Presbyterian Cemetery, East Maitland, NSW, by Rev. Alexander Smith,[192] according to the rites of the Presbyterian church.[207] Cause of death was general paralysis, 4 years duration.[192] Informant was Alfred Belmore Irwin (son) of East Maitland, NSW.[192] Louisa's funeral card read "In Loving Remembrance of  Louisa, Relict of the late Robert Irwin, Who departed this life May 14, 1910, Aged 60 years. One less at home! The charmed circle broken - a dear face Missed day by day from its accustomed place But cleansed and saved and perfected by grace, One more in heaven. One less on earth! Its pain, its sorrow and its toil to share. One less the pilgrim's daily cross to bear, One more the crown ransomed saints to wear. At home in heaven."[212] At the time of Robert's death, Louisa was living at Allandale, near Maitland, NSW.[187]

Children of Robert Irwin and Louisa Atkins:

i.
 
Ernest George Irwin, born 26/9/1867, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215,398] Died 31/5/1941, Rozelle, Sydney, NSW (73yo).[4,10,15,203] {Some genealogies claim died Raymond Terrace, howewer this conflicts with the information in the NSW BDM index} Did not marry.[4,10] On 22/10/1888 was awarded the Post Office mail contract for Bendolba and Underbank for the following year (1889), with mail to be delivered 3 days a week on horseback, at a salary of 26.[346]

ii.

Margaret Jane Irwin, born 1/3/1869, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215,398] Died 16/8/1942, Rockdale, Sydney.[10,15,203] Buried Section C, plot 30, Presbyterian section, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Married Samuel Matthew Patrick,[4,187,203,215] 25/1/1893, Glebe, Sydney.[4,10,15,398] Samuel s/o Matthew & Elizabeth, died 23/5/1943, Manly, Sydney, NSW,[163,410] & buried Section C, plot 30, Presbyterian section, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Samuel was a builder.[4]
Children: (a)
 
Reginald Samuel Patrick, born 1893, Rockdale, Sydney.[15] Died 26/6/1942, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15,410] Buried Section 1, plot 62, Congregational section, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Married Leanda V. Bennett, 1917, Kogarah, Sydney, NSW.[15] Ledavine died 27/12/1935 & buried with her husband.[410]
Children: (1)
 
Samuel John Patrick, born 1918, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Jeanette Burton, 1942, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(b)
Robert Samuel Patrick, born 1896, Rockdale, Sydney.[15] Married Dorothy Symon, 1922, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(c)
Ernest William Patrick, born 1900, Rockdale, Sydney.[15] Died 4/7/1958 & buried Section C, plot 31, Presbyterian section, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Married Elsie Gasnier, 1922, Sydney, NSW [15]:
(d)
Isabel M. Patrick, born 1904, Rockdale, Sydney.[15]
* iii.

Robert Samuel Irwin, born 11/9/1870, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215]

iv.

Louisa Irwin, born 4/2/1872 at Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215,398] Died 1960, Wyong, NSW.[163] Married Joseph William Paul,[4,10,215] 8/11/1905, Methodist Church, Stanmore, Sydney, NSW,[4,15,203,343,398] by Rev. J. G. Middleton.[343]
  "The wedding of Miss Louie Irwin, second daughter of the late Mr. Robert Irwin, of Dungog, with Mr. Joseph William Paul, of Wahroonga, Myrtle-street, Stanmore, was solemnised at the Stanmore Methodist Church on Wednesday, the 8th instant. The bride wore a beautiful dress of ivory chiffon silk, trimmed with lace and accordion-pleated chiffon, with a wreath and veil; she also wore a gold neck chain with a heart set in rubies, and a shower bouquet, the gifts of the bridegroom. The bridesmaids were Miss J. Burns, in cream silk muslin, trimmed with valenciennes lace, and a pink hat with a white ostrich feather, and carried a shower bouquet of pink roses and wore a gold true-lover's knot brooch, the gifts of the bridegroom; and Miss E. Irwin (cousin of the bride) and Miss Lizzie Johnston (cousin of the bridegroom) who wore cream volle, trimmed with lace, and violet coloured hats, and carried shower bouquets of yellow roses, which with gold wish-bone brooches were the gifts of the bridegroom. Little Miss Eva Dickson, daughter of Mr. Jas. Dickson, of Mosman, was dressed in cream, and carried a basket of roses and wore a gold brooch, the gifts of the bridegroom. Mr. E. T. S. M. Paul acted as best man, and Mr. F. S. Bowes and Mr. D. I Keys as groomsmen. After the ceremony, which was performed by the Rev. J. G. Middleton, assisted by the Rev. W. T. Stewart Wright (cousin of the bridegroom), the bridal party drove to the Petersham Town Hall, where the happy couple received the hearty congratulations of many relatives and friends, and the wedding breakfast was served, about 70 guests being entertained. Later Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Paul left for the Blue Mountains, the bride's travelling dress being a pale heliotrope silk volle, and a hat to match trimmed with lilac. Tho presents were numerous and costly, among which was a handsome marble, clock presented to the bridegroom by the staff of the Coastal Farmers' Co-operative Society."[343]  
Joseph, s/o Joseph Sr & Irvine, born 1871, Bathurst, NSW,[15,343] & died 1956, Burwood, Sydney, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Ruth Irvina Paul, born 1906, Petersham, Sydney, NSW.[15] Died 1944, Petersham, Sydney, NSW.[15] Did not marry.
(b)
Eadyth Louise Paul, born 1913, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Harold Edward Hadley, 1938, Sydney, NSW.[15]

v.

Sarah Matilda Irwin, born 29/7/1873, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215,398] Died 1957, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[163] Married Walter Thomas Phelps, 7/5/1902, Rockdale, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215,398] Walter was a carrier.[4]
Children: (a)
 
Robert S. Phelps, born 1903, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Mary E. Barlogio, 1929, Burwood, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married 2nd Dorothy Florence Warner, 1936, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(b)
Walter Phelps, born 1904, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15] Died 1950, Burwood, Sydney, NSW.[163] Married Ivy Dawes, 1934, Auburn, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(c)
Sadie Esther Phelps, born 1905, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Arthur Ellis, 1923, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(d)
Leslie Phelps, born 1907, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15] Died 1908, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(e)
Eva Phelps, born 1909, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Bartie Keith Wheeler, 1936, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(f)
Hilda M. Phelps, born 1912, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Mervyn John Stanfield, 1941, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15]

vi.
Ada Emma Irwin born 23/2/1875 at Tillegra (near Dungog), NSW.[4,10,15,194,196,197,203,215,398] Birth registered 31/3/1875, Dungog, NSW, informant for the birth was Robert Irwin of Tillegra, father, witnesses Hannah Wilkes & Jane Irwin.[194] Died 1/9/1957,[10,197,198,203] Chesalon Nursing Home, Crown Street, Harris Park, NSW.[198] Informant was David Robinson (son), of 37 Alexandra Street, Westmead, NSW.[198] Cause of death was myocardial failure (hours duration), paralysis agitans (Parkinson's Disease) & arteriosclerosis (both of years duration).[198] Buried 3/9/1957,[197,198] Section 1, plot 394, Presbyterian Section, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Married David Ross Robinson II, 28/12/1897, Union Church (presbyterian), Bandon Grove (near Dungog), NSW.[4,10,197,198,199,200,398] David was born 1875, Marrickville, Sydney, NSW,[15,197,199] and died 25/6/1944, St George Hospital, Kogarah, Sydney, NSW,[15,197,200] & buried Section 1, plot 394, Presbyterian Section, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] For additional information & descendants, refer to the Robinson chart.
Children: (a)
 
Gladys A. Robinson, born 1898 at Kogarah, NSW.[15,197,198,200]
(b)
Dorothy Irene Robinson, born 1900, Kogarah, NSW.[15,197,198,200]
(c)
David Ross Robinson III, born 1/9/1903, Kogarah, NSW.[15,197,198,200,201]
(d)
Marjorie Ellen Robinson, born 1905, Marrickville, Sydney, NSW.[15,197,198,200]

vii.
Hester Irwin, born 10/9/1876, Dubbo, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,208,215,398] Died 1951, Port Macquarie, NSW.[163,195] Married 1st Samuel George Monkley,[195,208,203] 20/6/1900, Bandon Grove, NSW.[4,10,15,187,189,190,195,398] Married was performed by Rev. Adamson.[189] Samuel died 1928, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]
  "On Wednesday, 20th instant, Bandon Grove Church was prettily decorated with ferns, well filled with smiling young folk and a sparkling of their olders, to witness the marriage ceremony of Miss Hester Irwin of Bandon Grove and Mr S.G. Monkley of Millers Forest. Rev Jas Adamson, Presbyterian Minister of Dungog, officiated. The chief bridesmaid was Miss May Irwin, sister to the bride, together with Misses Ruby and Ella, also sisters. Mr Geo Searle of Eskdale nephew of the groom acted as best man. The bride, who was given away by her father, was dressed in steel gray cloth, trimmed with cream mervieleaux silk and braid. Hat to match, trimmed with grey feathers and ospreys. Miss May Irwin, patriotic blue, trimmed with silk hat en suite. Misses Ella and Ruby blue reefer costumes. The ceremony took place at 11 am and at 12.30 the immediate friends sat down to a sumptuous breakfast at the home of the brides parents. The old time honoured custom of “cutting the cake” (a lovely three-decker) was performed very gracefully amid applause. Rev Adamson proposed “The bride and bridegroom” which was drunk with enthusiasm. The bridegroom responded. Mr Geo Searle proposed “The bridesmaids” which was honoured. Time would not allow of the usual number of toasts, and after farewells had been said Mr & Mrs Monkley left for their home at Millers Forest at 2.30 pm a distance of 41 miles, amid expressions of good wishes from a large circle of friends. The bride was a recipient of many beautiful presents - too numerous too mention severally. Mr & Mrs Monkley have the best wishes of their Bandon Grove and Millers Forest friends for a bright, happy and prosperous future."[189]  
Married 2nd Theodore Cecil Trotter,[4,10,203] 1940, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15,203] Theodore, s/o James & Sarah, died 1954, Port Macquarie, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Dorothy Jane Monkley, born 1901, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15] Died 1965, Newcastle, NSW.[163] Married George Fowler, 1923, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]
(b)
James Monkley, born 1902, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15] Married Constance Suters, 1926, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15] Married 2nd Mary Eunice Bubb, 1938, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]
(c)
Harold Monkley, born 1904, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15] Married Olive Hopkins, 1926, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]
(d)
Marjorie Monkley, born 1905, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15] Married Henry Bubb, 1929, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]
(e)
Minnie Monkley, born 1907, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15] Married Laughton Taylor, 1929, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]
(f)
William Monkley, born 1909, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15]
(g)
Frank Monkley, born 1912, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15]
(h)
Alice Monkley, born 1913, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15] Married Harry Woodlands, 1932, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]
(i)
Florence Monkley, born 1914, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15] Married Ronald Ian Hale, 1943, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(j)
Edith Monkley, born 1916, Dungog, NSW.[15] Married James Eric Bain, 1940, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]

viii.
Florence Irwin, born 7/6/1878, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215,398] Died 3/9/1879, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215,398]

ix.
Laura Irwin, born 17/7/1879, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215,398] Died 1956, Mayfield, Sydney, NSW.[163] Married Frederick Joseph Wade,[203,215] 14/12/1904, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[4,10,15,398] Frederick, s/o Joseph & Christine, died 1958, Mayfield, Sydney, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Russel I. Wade, born 1905, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Grace Gear, 1926, Hamilton, NSW.[15]
(b)
Robert F. Wade, born 1908, East Maitland, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Gladys Raisbick, 1930, West Maitland, NSW.[15]
(c)
Alice Laura Wade, born 1911, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Married William Lean, 1935, East Maitland, NSW.[15]
(d)
Charles Kirkpatrick Wade, born 1913, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Died 25/12/1956,[203] Dungog, NSW.[163] Married Doris Wilkinson, 1934, Morpeth, NSW.[15]
(e)
Jeffrie Leslie Wade, born 1916, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Joyce Isabel Wilkinson, 1938, West Maitland, NSW.[15]
(f)
Mary Aileen Wade, born 1918, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Leonard Albert Roy Dobson, 1941, Hamilton, NSW.[15]

x.
Ethel May Irwin, born 22/5/1881, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215,398] Died 1966, East Maitland, NSW.[163] Married Edward T. Stanton,[203,215] 24/6/1903, Maitland, NSW.[4,10,15,398] Edward, s/o James & Amelia, died 1958, East Maitland, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Leslie Herbert Stanton, born 1904, Wingham, NSW.[15] Married Rita Josephine Henry, 1937, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]
(b)
Stanley J. Stanton, born 1905, Wingham, NSW.[15] Married Shelia Welsford, 1934, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]
(c)
Melvie G. Stanton, born 1907, Wingham, NSW.[15] Married Raymond Garvan, 1930, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]
(d)
Amelia Louise Stanton, born 1908, Wingham, NSW.[15] Married Thomas Lynch, 1936, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15]
(e)
Doris May Stanton, born 1911, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15] Married Francis William Ninness, 1939, Taree, NSW.[15]
(f)
Ruby May Stanton, born 1912, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15] Married Norman Cook, 1934, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(g)
Ethel May Stanton, born 1916, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15] Married George Ernest Allison, 1936, Grafton, NSW.[15]

xi.
Herbert Joseph Irwin, born 30/3/1883, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215,398] Died 28/12/1963, 54 Caledonia Street, Bexley, Rockdale district, Sydney, NSW.[163,197,203,410] Ashes interred panel 21 JJ, 1579, Wall of Memories, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Married Jeanette 'Netta' Buffa Young, 14/8/1906, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[4,10,15,203,398] Jeanette, d/o James & Kate, born 7/10/1882, died 12/9/1968, Kogarah, Sydney, NSW,[163,203] & her ashes interred panel 21 JJ, 1580, Wall of Memories, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410]
Children: (a)
 
Irene Buffa Irwin, born 1907, Hurstville, Sydney, NSW.[15,203] Died 30/1/1978, NSW.[163,203,410] Ashes interred panel AA, 100, Wall of Memories, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Did not marry.
(b)
Elise K. Irwin, born 1907, Hurstville, Sydney, NSW.[15,203] Died 13/3/1988.[203] Married Leslie H. Preston, 1929, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15,203]
(c)
Jeanette D. M. Irwin, born 1911, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15,203] Died 20/6/1996.[203] Married Charles D. Fisher, 1934, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[163]
(d)
Dorothy E. Irwin, born 1913, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15,203] Married Leonard R. Mungoven, 1931, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15,203]
(e)
Edna Hazel Irwin, born 1915, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15,203] Married John Clark, 1937, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15,203]
(f)
Herbert Charles Irwin, born 1920, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[203] Died 30/3/2009 & his ashes interred plot 31-129, Rose Gardens, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Married Jean MacRae, 1942, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[163] Jean died 8/6/2009 & her ashes interred plot 31 - 37, Rose Gardens, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410]
* xii.
Thomas Gray Irwin, born 17/12/1884, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,188,192,203,215,398]

xiii.
Alfred Belmore Irwin, born 1/10/1886, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215,398] Died 23/3/1967, Kogarah, Sydney, NSW.[163,410] Ashes interred plot 139, Rose Gardens, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Builder.[209] Married May Jean Howarth,[4,10,203] 2/10/1913, Holy Trinity Church, Erskineville, Sydney, NSW.[15,398,411] May born 17/1/1887,[411] died 14/6/1963 & her ashes interred plot 137, Rose Gardens, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Resided 1910, East Maitland, NSW.[192] Resided 1911, Newtown, Sydney, NSW.[411]
Children: (a)
 
Jean Irwin, born 24/3/1915, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15,203,411] Died 30/8/1998, cremated & ashes interred 26-13, Evergreen Shrub Garden, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Married Stanley Paul Barnham,[409] 1938, Sydney, NSW.[15] Stanley died 25/7/2008, cremated & ashes interred 26-13, Evergreen Shrub Garden, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Had issue.[409] Resided Waycott Ave, Kingsgrove, Sydney, NSW.[409]
(b)
Jack Irwin, born 18/9/1918, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[15,203,209,411] Died 10/10/2009, Kyle Bay, Sydney, NSW,[209,210] & ashes interred plot 193, Rose Gardens, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[410] Married Mavis Tibbetts,[409] 1953, Sydney, NSW.[15] Had issue.[209]
(c)

Alfred 'Tim' Irwin,[163,209] born 12/2/1925, Rockdale, Sydney, NSW.[411] Died 5/3/2014, Taren Point, NSW, Australia.[411]
Served in the RAAF from 1943-1945 on the Coral Sea (Solomon Islands) battlefield.[411] Builder.[411] Along with his brother, Jack, c.1949  took over operation of his father's building company, A. B. Irwin Builders.[411]  Married Nancy [209] Grace Swift, 1/2/1957, Hurstville Presbyterian Church, Hurstville, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[163,411] Nancy Grace born 18/7/1930, Brunkerville NSW & died 18/8/2011, her ashes interred next to Tim at Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW, Australia.[411] Had issue.[209]

xiv.
Violet Ella Irwin, born 6/6/1888, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215,398] Died 18/1/1973, Sydney, NSW.[10,163,203,215] Cremated & ashes interred with her father, Section C, plot 29, Presbyterian Section, Woronora General Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[409,410] Did not marry.[10,398] Was a guest at the marriage of Wynn Baldwin & Maud Bignall, 1908, Holy Trinity, Manilla, NSW.[230] She gifted the couple with a silver jam spoon & butter knife.[230]

xv.
Ruby Muriel Irwin, born 17/4/1890, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215,398] Died 10/2/1977, Orange, NSW (86yo).[163,203,215] Married Maynard King,[4,203,215] 6/4/1921, Phillip Street, Sydney, NSW.[10,15,398] Maynard, s/o Ernest & Sarah, died 1964, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW.[163]


Robert Irwin, 1844-1901
Robert Irwin, 1844-1901
Image - David Powell
Robert Irwin's death card, 1901
Robert Irwin's death card
Image - David Powell
Louisa Irwin's death card, 1910
Robert Irwin's death card
Image - David Powell
Herbert Joseph Irwin
Herbert Joseph Irwin
Image - David Powell
Violet Ella Irwin (L) & Pauline Flowers (d/o Ada)
Violet Ella Irwin (L)
Image - David Powell
Ruby Muriel Irwin
Ruby Muriel Irwin
Image - David Powell
  
Robert Irwin gravestone, Woronora Cemetery
Robert Irwin gravestone, Woronora Cemetery
Image - Colin Irwin


Louisa Irwin grave, East Maitland
Louisa Irwin grave, East Maitland
Image - Colin Irwin


Hilda Tibbett's marriage - Jack Irwin 2L, Alfred Irwin 4L
Tim Irwin & Nancy Swift's marriage, 1957: unknown,
Jack Irwin, Tim & Nancy (front), Alfred Sr Irwin,
Jack Hutcheson, May Irwin, others unknown

Image - Colin Irwin. ID's Paul Barnham & Craig irwin
   
Marjorie, Ada (nee Irwin) & David Jr Robinson, 1947
Marjorie, Ada (nee Irwin) & David Jr Robinson, 1947
Image - David Powell
Farm, Allandale
Farm, Allandale
Image Google Streetview
Stanmore Methodist Church
Stanmore Methodist Church
Image Google Streetview

   

1.1.1.6. Mary Ann Irwin, born 1846, Maitland.[4,5,10,15,186,203,215] Died 1899, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Robert Christie Leslie, 16/6/1865, Tillegra, NSW, by Rev. Thomas Stirton, Presbyterian Church.[4,10,15,203] Witnesses James Irwin & Elizabeth Towers.[10] Robert a farmer of Tillegra, NSW.[4,10] Robert, s/o Robert & Mary, died 1960, Dungog, NSW.[163]

Children of Mary Ann Irwin & Robert Christie Leslie:

i.
 
William Leslie,[4,10,203] born 1866, Tillegra, NSW.[15] Died 1942, Gloucester, NSW.[163]

ii.

Margaret Leslie,[4,10,203] born 1867, Tillegra, NSW.[15] Did not marry.[10]

iii.

Irwin Leslie,[4,10,203] born 1871, Tillegra, NSW.[15] Died 1956, Dungog, NSW.[163]

iv.

Thomas Leslie,[4,10,203] born 1874, Tillegra, NSW.[15] Died 1961, West Wallsend, NSW.[163]

v.

Robert Christie Leslie,[4,10,203] born 1876, Tillegra, NSW.[15] Died 1945, Manly, Sydney, NSW.[163] Employed at Dungon Chronicle.[10] Printer, 1902.[10] Married Alice May Eagleton, 20/8/1902, Clarence Town, NSW.[10,15]
Children: (a)
 
Ronald R. Leslie, born 1909, Dungog, NSW.[15] Married Florence Galloway, 1934, Burwood, Sydney, NSW.[15]

vi.
James Kirkpatrick Leslie,[4,10,203] born 1879, Tillegra, NSW.[15] Died 1958, Dubbo, NSW.[163] Married Catherine E. Rosewarne, 1920, Canowindra, NSW.[163]

vii.
George Jeffrey Leslie,[4,203] born 7/2/1883, Tillegra, NSW.[10,15] Died 1965, Manly, Sydney, NSW.[163] Married Ida Caldwell, 1913, Balmain South, Sydney, NSW.[15]
Children: (a)
 
Aileen Vida Leslie, born 1914, Armidale, NSW.[15] Married Maldwyn Hodren Davies, 1941, Canterbury, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(b)
Sybil Myra Leslie, born 1917, Armidale, NSW.[15] Married Justin Arthur Olive O'Brien, 1943, Sydney, NSW.[15]

viii.
Evaline/Evelyn Leslie,[,2034] born 22/10/1885, Bendolba, NSW.[10,15] Died 16/12/1890, Bendolba, NSW (4yo).[4,15,203] No issue.

ix.
Vada/Vida Isabella Leslie,[4,203] born 10/5/1889, Bendolba, NSW.[10,15] Died 1911, Bendolba, NSW.[15] No issue.


Tillegra Valley
Tillegra Valley
Image Mark Simpson [Flickr]
Chichester Dam Road, Bendolba
Chichester Dam Road, Bendolba
Image 'sachman75' [Flickr]
St. Andrew's Presbyterian, Dungog
St. Andrew's Presbyterian, Dungog
G. Christie [Churches Of The Hunter Valley]



1.1.1.7. Richard Dunbar Irwin, born 22/12/1849, Tillegra, NSW.[4,5,10,186,203,215] Died 27/3/1933, Auburn, Sydney, NSW (83yo),[4,15,203,215,224] & buried section 5F, row 31, grave 3044, Presbyterian Section, Rookwood Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[224] Farmer at Tillegra and sometime worker at John Wade's Cornflour Mill, Dungog.[4,10] Married Laura Alexander, 3/2/1873, Dungog, NSW,[4,10,15,203,215] at the house of Thomas Stewart Alexander, by Rev. Thomas Stirton, Presbyterian Church.[10] Witnesses were Thomas Irwin & Margaret Alexander.[10] Laura was born 1854, Gloucester, NSW, died 3/11/1933, Marrickville, Sydney, NSW,[15,224] & buried with her husband, section 5F, row 31, grave 3044, Presbyterian Section, Rookwood Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[224] Resided 1907, National Street, Leichardt, Sydney, NSW.[342]

Children of Richard Dunbar Irwin & Laura Alexander:

i.
 
Agnes Irwin, born 23/6/1874, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215] Died 1968, Parramatta, NSW.[163] Married Percival Mark Jarvis, 6/2/1907, National Street, Leichardt, Sydney, NSW.[4,15,203,215,342] By Rev. George Milne, at the home of Agnes' parents.[342] Percival resided Camperdown, Sydney, NSW.[342] Percival, s/o Richard & Hannah, died 1944, Auburn, Sydney, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Alice I. Jarvis, born 1907, Petersham, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Leonard Maurer, 1934, Auburn, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(b)
Isabel N. Jarvis, born 1909, Hurstville, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(c)
Arthur Norman Jarvis, born 1911, Hurstville, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Annie Gertrude Cloke, 1938, Liverpool, NSW.[15]
(d)
Milton R. Jarvis, born 1914, Petersham, Sydney, NSW.[15]

ii.

Annabella Irwin, born 11/8/1876, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215] Died 1967, Ballina, NSW.[163] Married George Lowrey, 1901, Dungog, NSW.[4,15,203,215,221] George, s/o William & Louisa, born 27/12/1872, Dungog, NSW & died 12/8/1941, Ballina, NSW.[163,221]
Children: (a)
 
William D. Lowrey, born 1901, Dungog, NSW.[15] Married Hazel E. Sommerland, 1935, Tenterfield, NSW.[15]
(b)
Amy J. Lowrey, born 1905, Dungog, NSW.[15] Married George Meldrum, 1928, Lismore, NSW.[15]
(c)
Ronald A. Lowrey, born 1907, Morpeth, NSW.[15] Married Gladys Clare, 1932, Grafton, NSW.[15]
(d)
Richard Perrier Yates Lowrey, born 1909, Lismore, NSW.[15] Married Flora Belle McInnes, 1942, Grafton, NSW.[15]
(e)
Cecil George Lowrey, born 1912, Lismore, NSW.[15] Married Linda Sommerland, 1943, Tenterfield, NSW.[15]

iii.

Arthur Dunbar Irwin, born 18/8/1878, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215] Died 1962, Sydney, NSW.[163] Store keeper, Dungog.[10]
  "Dungog Murder, Preliminary Proceedings. Proceedings were on Saturday continued at the Water Police Court, presided over by Mr. C. N. Payten, S.M., in connection with an application for the issue of a warrant for the apprehension of Wilhelm Gerlach; who is suspected of the murder of Frank Coleman at Dungog about October 24. Mr. Bathgate (Crown Law Office) appeared, to press the application. Arthur Dunbar Irwin, manager of Dark's, general store at Dungog, said that on October 25 a man whom he could describe called in his shop. He was about 35 years of age, 5ft 7in high, a German, weighing about 12.5 stone. He was dark and clean-shaved and had a prominent upper lip, with big features, especially about the nose and Jaw. He spoke with a foreign accent. The man was a cash customer at the stores, and his name was unknown. The store was about five miles from Maxwell's Creek. When he entered the store he asked for the store hawker to be sent to his camp, as he wished to draw money from the Savings Bank, and the hawker could identify him. Later he asked witness to go and identify him, and witness went with the German to the Savings Bank, and was shown a passbook with the name of Frank Coleman on it, and witness witnessed his signature as Frank Coleman, although he did not know the man by that or any other name. Witness never saw him with a bank passbook before. George Richard Brown, a storekeeper at Hook's Hill, near Dungog, said that he knew German Bill and a man named Jack, who were camped at Maxwell's Creek, and were mates. About October 21 he saw Jack on the wharf, and the man he knew as German Bill came to his shop about October 25. Shown a photograph, he said that it was of the man he knew as Jack. Witness asked Bill where his mate was, and received the reply that he had gone away by the coach that morning. Later he saw German Bill carrying a portmanteau. On October 26 Bill arranged with him to go to Clarence Town. On the way witness asked him what Jack was going to do, and Bill said that he was going to start a second-hand shop in Sydney, and that he (Bill) thought be would go to California. On arrival at Clarence Town he got on a boat and went to Newcastle. The last time he saw Jack was two or three days before Bill went away. He had not seen him since. John George Johnston, a labourer on the railway extension works at Dungog, and camped at Maxwell's Creek, said that he was camped close to men he knew as Jack Foreman and German Bill. The photograph produced he recognised as that of Jack Foreman. Witness had heard Bill called Gibb and Napoleon. Witness left Maxwell's Creek about two months ago, but while there had at different times been in German Bill's tent. He identified the padded quilt produced as having belonged to German Bill. On October 25 he saw Bill at Dungog, and had a drink with him, and in the course of conversation he told witness that he was going back to Sydney or the Blue Mountains, as it was cooler there. He also said, "I missed the coach this morning, and came into Dungog to spend the day, but I intend to go away tomorrow through Clarence Town." Witness asked him what Jack was going to do, and received the reply that he was going to start a business at Newcastle. Witness was friendly with both Bill and Jack. On the walls of Bill's tent were three drawings in red chalk representing Bill and two other men. John Davidson, a clerk in the Government Savings Bank, recalled, said that the paper shown him indicated that an account was opened in the bank on June 22, 1906, in the name of Jack Coleman at the George-street North Post Office Savings Bank, and on April 21, 1909, it was transferred to Newcastle. It was operated on by a person purporting to be Coleman on October 25 by a withdrawal. The balance of the account was transferred to the head office in Moore-street for payment. At this stage the further hearing was adjourned until Tuesday next."(Sydney Morning Herald, 29/11/1909).[347]  
Married Amelia Gertrude M. Coombs,[10] 1909, Lismore, NSW.[4,15,203,215] Amelia, d/o James & Sophia, died 1963, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[163] Resided 1909, Dungog, NSW.[347]
Children: (a)
 
Harold Dunbar Stewart Irwin,[10] born 1910, Dungog, NSW [15,203,215] Died 28/6/1915, Dunedoo, NSW,[15,203,215] & buried Allotment 59, Section C9, Presbyterian Section, Dungog Cemetery, Dungog, NSW.[185]
(b)
Stewart James Irwin, born 1915, Dunedoo, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Mavis June Salvesen, 1945, Ashfield, Sydney, NSW.[15,203,215]

iv.

Ethel Margaret Irwin, born 24/3/1881, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215] Died 6/10/1962, Burwood, Sydney, NSW,[163] & buried with her parents, section 5F, row 31, grave 3044, Presbyterian Section, Rookwood Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[224] Married George Alfred Sully, 1907, Petersham, Sydney, NSW.[163] George, s/o John & Olive, died 14/6/1968, Burwood, Sydney, NSW,[163,224] & buried with his wife, section 5F, row 31, grave 3044, Presbyterian Section, Rookwood Cemetery, Sydney, NSW.[224]
Children: (a)
 
Cecil George Sully, born 1902, Sydney, NSW.[15] No further record.
(b)
Laura Olive Sully, born 1908, Petersham, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Henry C. Hickin, 1935, Auburn, Sydney, NSW.[163]
(c)
John Irwin Sully, born 1910, Petersham, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Dorothy Bessell King, 1945, Burwood, Sydney, NSW.[163]
(d)
Alexander George Sully, born 1913, Canterbury, Sydney, NSW.[15] Married Catherine Murchie, 1945, Marricksville, Sydney, NSW.[163]

    
Petersham Presbyterian Church
Petersham Presbyterian Church
Image Sydney Suburban Organs
National Street, Leichhardt
National Street, Leichhardt
Image Google Streetview
National Street, Leichhardt
National Street, Leichhardt
Image Google Streetview

   


   

1.1.1.1.1. John Edward Irwin,[218,219] born 7/3/1856, Tillegra, Bendobla, NSW.[4,10,15,203,205,215,230] Died 8/8/1953, Dungog, NSW.[163,203,205,215,230] Farmer, 1917.[10] At some time between 1887-1905 John was an elder at the Presbyterian Church, Bandon Grove, NSW.[226] Married Emma Cox,[203,215] 29/8/1879, Dungog, NSW.[15,205,230] Emma, d/o Thomas & Mary, born 24/9/1858, died 13/3/1932, Dungog, NSW.[163,205] Resided 1905, Bendolba, NSW.[4] Resided 1912,1914,1916,1917, Bandon Grove, NSW.[4,10,218,219,376]

Children of John Edward Irwin & Emma Cox:

i.
 
Edward Thomas Irwin, born 21/2/1880, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,205,215,230] Died 21/6/1969, Lismore, NSW.[163,205] Married Alice Evelyn Walker,[215] 4/6/1913, Patterson, NSW.[15,205] Alice born 30/4/1888, died 30/7/1983.[205]
Children: (a)
 
Edith Elsie Irwin, born 8/3/1914, Dungog, NSW.[15,205,215] Died 2/5/202, Lismore, NSW, Australia.[205] Married Stephen Patrick Fields, 14/4/1937, Lismore, NSW.[15,205] 8 children.[205]
(b)
Edna I. Irwin, born 1915, Dunedoo, NSW.[15] Married Percy C. Houlden, 1934, Lismore, NSW.[163]
(c)
Beryl Emma Irwin, born 1916, Dungog, NSW.[15] Married Thomas Stephen Darragh, 1943, Kyogle, NSW.[15]
(d)
Thelma Hilda Irwin, born 1918, Dungog, NSW.[15] Married Stanley Willis Croft, 1943, Woollahra, Sydney, NSW.[15]
(e)
Walter Edgar Irwin, born Dungog, NSW.[15] Died 1939, Kyogle, NSW.[15]

ii.

Evelyn Mary Irwin, born 3/4/1882, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,205,215,230] Died 8/9/1946, Dungog, NSW.[163,203,205,215] Married Duncan McRae Blow,[203,215] 23/8/1911, Dungog, NSW.[163,205] Duncan, s/o William & Helen, born 1885 & died 5/10/1974, NSW.[163,205]
Children: (a)
 
Alan McCrae Blow, born 11/9/1912.[205] Died 13/12/1964.[205] Married Jean Flora McNeal, 1933, Mayfield, Sydney, NSW.[163,205] Married 2nd Dorothy Fuller, c.1943.[205] Dororthy born 31/3/1921.[205]
(b)
Elsie Isabel Blow, born 11/2/1915.[205] Died 1967,[205] St Leonards, Sydney, NSW.[163] Married Alexander Robert Adie, 1941, Hamilton, NSW.[163,205]
(c)
Thomas Alexander Blow, born 8/1917.[205] Died 19/6/1987.[205] Married Dorothy Watt.[205]
(d)
Mary Blow, born 2/2/1922.[205] Married Ross Smith Bain,[205] 1950, Auburn, Sydney, NSW.[163]

iii.

Elsie Mary Irwin, born 14/6/1884, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,205,215,230] Died 3/1/1905, Dungog, NSW [4,15,203,205,215] "Elsie Mary Irwin, 3/1/1905. The grim reaper added another to his late long list of victims in this district on Wednesday fore noon last, when Miss Elsie Irwin, aged 20, second eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs J Irwin, of Bendolba, succumbed to typhoid fever. The deceased young lady had been ailing for about a fortnight, and on the previous (Tuesday) morning was admitted to the local hospital, where the sad event took place much sympathy is felt for the bereaved parents in their great affliction. The funeral took place yesterday evening, when the mortal remains of the deceased were consigned to their last resting place in the Church of England cemetery at Bendolba, the Rev D. Smith officiating."(Dungog Chronicle, 6/1/1905).[4]

iv.

Walter George Irwin, born 1/9/1886, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,205,215,218,230,376] Died 12/7/1957, Dungog, NSW [163,203,205,215] Farmer, 1914.[218,376] Enlisted Australian Imperial Force, 22/8/1914, then residing residing Bandon Grove, giving next of kin as father, G.E. Irwin.[376] At enlistment was 28yrs 11months old, 5' 5" high, weighed 8st 6lb, had fair complexion, grey eyes, brown hair, had a scar below the right knee, Presbyterian.[376] Assigned, No.1 Light Horse, 25/8/1914, rank of corporal, service number 124.[218,227,376] At the time of enlistment was serving in the 6th Light Horse.[376] Embarked from Sydney, 20/10/1914, on board the 'Star of Victoria'.[218,376] On 3/5/1915 was given a medical discharge, "weak heart & loss of memory".[376] Departed from Suez, Egypt, 11/3/1915, & returned to Australia, 11/3/1915.[376] Issued with Star, British War Medal & Victory medal.[376] On 7/11/1941, then residing Bandon Grove, Walter wrote to Base Records, Victoria Barracks asking that his decorations be forwarded to him as he had not previously applied for them, "After embarking he landed in Egypt & was attached to the 1st Aust. Light Horse Regiment but was invalidated home in 1915 as medically unfit."[376] Married Hilda Emma Morgan, 1927, Hillston, NSW.[163,203,215] Hilda, d/o John & Emma, born 1892 & died 6/10/1965, Gosford, NSW.[163,203,205,215] Resided 1914, 1941, Bandon Grove, near Bendolba, NSW.[218,376]

v.

Jessie Jane Irwin, born 10/7/1890, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,205,215] Died 7/9/1927, Barraba, NSW.[163,205] Married Phillip Starr, 29/3/1916, St Andrew's, Dungog, NSW, Australia.[205,215] {Marriage indexed as Jesse Irwin} Phillip, s/o Samuel & Elizabeth, born 21/1/1887 & died 24/9/1975, NSW.[163,205]

vi.
Christina Maud Irwin, born 25/5/1892, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,205,215] Died 21/6/1905, Dungog, NSW [4,15,203,205,215] "Death for the second time this year the grim reaper has visited the household of Mr John Irwin, of Bendolba. Several months back a daughter in the bloom of womanhood was claimed as the victim, But on Wednesday morning last it was a younger daughter Maud aged 13 years. Who was called to her eternal rest. The deceased girl, we are informed contracted Cerebro Spinal Meningitis about a fortnight since, and was last week removed to the local hospital where despite everything that could be done the end came as stated. Her remains were conveyed to Bendolba for interment yesterday (Thursday). The Rev. F. A. Cadell conducting the service in the Church of England cemetery. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Irwin in the great trouble which has come upon them."[4]

vii.
Alexander Joseph Irwin, born 16/8/1894, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,205,215,219,376] Died 25/10/1947,[163,203,205,215] Dungog, NSW.[163] Presbyterian.[218] Farmer, 1916.[219,376] Enlisted Australian Imperial Force, 25/1/1916, then residing residing Bandon Grove, giving next of kin as father, John E. Irwin.[376] At enlistment was 21yrs 5 months old, 5' 7.25" high, weighed 127lb, had dark complexion, brown hair & eyes, presbyterian.[376] Assigned, 16th Reinforcements, 4th Battalion, 22/2/1916, service number 5130, rank of private.[219,376] Embarked from Sydney, NSW on board the 'Makarini', 1/4/1916.[219,376] Transferred to 56th battalion, 24/5/1916; admitted to 3rd Canadian Hospital, sick with pneumonia, 11/7/1916; telegram to father, of Bandon Grove, notifying him that Alexander dangerously ill with pneumonia, 20/7/1916; telegram to father, of Bandon Grove, notifying him that Alexander's condition was stable, 29/7/1916; telegram to father, of Bandon Grove, notifying him that Alexander had been removed from the dangerously ill list & was recovering well, 1/8/1916.[376] Departed Folkestone for France, 24/1/1917; rejoined battalion, 7/2/1917; wounded in action, Rouen, France, 2/4/1917; rejoined battalion, 24/5/1917; admitted to hospital, injured accidentally, 15/7/1918; discharged to unit, 24/7/1918; detached for duty with A.P.M. 5th Division headquarters, 11/8/1917; transferred to 5th Division Traffic Control, France, from 56th Battalion, 24/8/1918; invalidated to UK with fractured right fibula, 31/8/1918; admitted to Southwark Hospital with a severely fractured fibula, 1/9/1918; departed england, 4/1/1919, returning to Australia 25/2/1919 & discharged 9/5/1919.[376] Received the British War Medal & Victory medal.[219,376] Married Myra Lea, 14/12/1925,[203,205,215] West Maitland, NSW.[163] Myra, d/o Emanuel & Elizabeth, born 5/10/1901, died 25/6/1965, Dungog, NSW.[163,205,215] Resided 1916, Bandon Grove, near Bendolba, NSW.[218]

viii.
Nellie Mabel Irwin, born 22/4/1897, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,205,215] Died 9/10/1970, Sydney, NSW.[163,205] Married Aaron Edgar Flarrety, 6/5/1918,[203,205,215] Dungog, NSW.[163] Aaron, s/o John & Margaret, died 1956, Macksville, NSW.[163]


Evelyn & Elsie Irwin, 1890s
Evelyn & Elsie Irwin, 1890s
Image - Robyn Nesbitt
Returned Servicemen, Dungog, 1919
Returned Servicemen, Dungog, 1919
Australian War Memorial
Returned Servicemen, Dungog, 1919
Returned Servicemen, Dungog, 1919
Australian War Memorial



1.1.1.3.1. Jane Irwin, born 12/8/1862, Tillegra, NSW.[4,10,15,203,211,215,230] Died 13/5/1890,[4,15,163,203,211,230] Bandon Grove, NSW,[163,211,215,230] & buried 14/5/1890,[211,230] Church of England Cemetery, Bendolba, NSW.[230]
  "Death - it is with feelings of regret that we record the death of Mrs Alfred Bignell, which took place on Tuesday last at Bandon Grove. Deceased who had been in a delicate state of health for some time past, was confined on the previous Wednesday and appeared to be doing well until Saturday morning when she took a sudden turn for the worse, and gradually sank, despite the most skillful and assiduous attempts of Dr McMath and her relatives. The late Mrs Bignell was a daughter of Mr John Irwin of Tillegra. The funeral took place on Wednesday afternoon, her remains, which were interred at the Church of England cemetery at Bendolba, being followed to their last resting place by a very large number of people. The Rev JW Upjohn conducted the burial service. Much sympathy is expressed for Mr Bignell who has four young children to care for."(Dungog Chronicle, 20/5/1890).[230]  
Married Alfred Stanley Bignell, 10/5/1882, Bendolba, NSW,[4,15,203,211,215,230] at the home of Jane's parents, James & Elizabeth Irwin.[211] Alfred born 28/12/1855, Bandon Grove, NSW,[203,211,215,230] s/o James & Amelia, died 1944, Islington, NSW,[163,230] & buried Sandgate Cemetery, Newcastle, NSW.[211,230]
  "The late Alfred Bignell, whose death was briefly reported in our last issue, was born at Bandon Grove 89 1/2 years ago, and lived in the district until a few years ago. He was one of the finest cricketers the Williams River ever produced. As a sportsman on and off the field, he was not excelled. He made twice as many centuries as any of our best players, said J. E. Irwin, a cricket contemporary Mr. Irwin added that he was invited to go to Sydney to play before the selectors who were picking the team to represent Australia in England in the Test series. After his active participation in the game, he was an enthusiastic adviser; and coach, and later on he was a spectator at matches every Saturday. He loved the game. The late Mr. Bignell was twice married. His first wife was Miss Jane Irwin, and of that union there were one daughter, Elsie (Mrs. Arch Duggan, Underbank) and three sons, Duncan ("Bun") (Maitland), Thomas (Newcastle), and James (who was accidently killed at Wangat Dam construction works). His second wife was Miss Mary Irwin, and of that union, there were five sons, Archibald (Hamilton), Frank (Hamilton), Victor (Islington), Walter (A.l.F.), and Stanley (Lambton). Deceased's brother, Joe, was also a noted cricketer. In their time there were on the scoring books the names of such players as H. S. Crowther, W. Potter, J. Hodges, "Cuffy" Webber, Ernie Elliott, Filshie, Bergin, Readett, Lowrey, Jack Watts and others. The late Alfred Bignell was not only a star batsman but a first-class bowler and a superb “slip” field. Deceased had been living with his son, Victor, at Islington for some years. His interment took place at Sandgate cemetery on Wednesday last."[230]  
Alfred married 2nd Jane's sister, Mary Irwin. Alfred was a dairyman & inherited James Bignell's farm, Willow Grove, Bandon Grove.[230] Resided 1904, Underbank, near Dungog, NSW.[230] Resided 1914,1916 Rocky Hill, near Dungog, NSW.[230]

Children of Jane Irwin & Alfred Stanley Bignell:

i.
 
Elsie Maud Bignell, born 29/5/1883, Willow Grove, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Died 1961, Underbank, Dungog, NSW.[163,230] Married Archibald John Duggan, 21/2/1906, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Archibald, s/o Stephen & Annie, died 1951, Dungog, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Leon William Bignell, born 20/6/1900, Dungog, NSW.[15,211,230] Died 26/7/1976, NSW.[163,211,230] 2nd AIF.[230] Married Maria J. Nash, 1921, Newcastle, NSW.[15,211,230] Maria, d/o Edward & Annie, born Tamworth, NSW, died 1982.[211]
Children: (1)
 
Kenneth Bignell, born 1923, Wangat, Wallarobba Shire, NSW.[211,230]
(2)
Robert James Bignell, born 16/2/1924, Wangat, NSW.[211,230] Married Kathleen Agnes Byrd, 25/12/1949, Newtown, Sydney, NSW.[163,211] Married 2nd Irene Alicia Ariansen, 28/5/1969.[211]
(3)
Jean Bignell, born Wangat, NSW.[211] Married William White.[211]
(4)
Douglas J. Bignell, born 1928, Wangat, NSW.[211] Died 1930, Wangat, NSW (2yo).[15]
(b)
Hector Maurice Duggan,[215] born 1906, Dungog, NSW.[15,211,230] Died 1974, NSW.[163] Married Ethel Muriel Moore, 1938, Dungog, NSW.[15,230]
(c)
Gregory Duggan, born 14/11/1909, Dungog, NSW.[15,211,230] Died 17/7/1988.[211,230]
(d)
Annie 'Dolly' Isobel Duggan,[215] born 1916, Dungog, NSW.[15,211,230] Married Bertram James Hadley, 1946, Islington, NSW.[163]
(e)
Alfred Edgar Duggan,[215] born 1920, Dungog, NSW.[211,230] Married Dorothy Jane Hamilton,[215] 1948, Cessnock, NSW.[163]
(f)
Marjory Joyce Duggan, born Dungog, NSW.[211,230] Married Alfred Thomas McCormick, 1949, Islington, NSW.[163]

ii.

John Duncan Bignell, born 30/10/1885, Willow Grove, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Died 1967, Maitland, NSW,[163,230] & buried Campbell Hill Cemetery, Maitland, NSW.[230] Married Amy A. Walker, 1911, Paterson, NSW.[15,230]
Children: (a)
 
Alfred Duncan Bignell, born 1916, Dungog, NSW.[15,230] Married Mona Rosabelle Jenkins, 1939, Paterson, NSW.[163]
(b)
Beatrice Bignell.[230]
(c)
Lindsay Bignell.[230]

iii.

Harold Harley Bignell, born 27/3/1888, Bandon Grove, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Married Evelyn Alice Monnox, 1915, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Evelyn, d/o John & Margaret, died 1958, Lambton, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Mary Eileen Bignell, born 1916, Dungog, NSW.[15,211,215,230] Married Charles Engel, 1937, Dungog, NSW.[15,230]
(b)
Margaret Gwendoline Bignell, born 1918, Dungog, NSW.[15,211,215,230] Married Delwyn Sylvester Gilbert, 1941, Wickham, NSW.[15,230]
(c)
John James Bignell, born 1929, Dungog, NSW.[230] Died 1937, Dungog, NSW.[230]

iv.

Jane Bignell, born 7/5/1890, Bandon Grove, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Died 1890, Bandon Grove, NSW.[230]

v.

Alfred James Bignell, born 7/5/1890, Bandon Grove, NSW.[15,203,211,215,230] Died 10/2/1925, Wangat, NSW,[15,203,230] & buried Bandon Grove, NSW.[230] Served in AIF, WW1.[230] Married Nilsie E. McLoughlin, 1917, Taralga, NSW.[15]

   
Abandoned cottage, Bandon Grove
Abandoned cottage, Bandon Grove
Image 'krugerprings' [Flickr]
Map of Bandon Grove, 1837
Map of Bandon Grove, 1837
Image - Family of Henry Bignall
Farmhouse, Bandon Grove
Farmhouse, Bandon Grove
Image Century21

   


1.1.1.5.1 Robert Samuel Irwin, born 11/9/1870, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,192,203,215] Died 31/8/1953,[4,10,163,203,215] Hamilton, NSW.[163] Married Emily Mary Ann Curr, 11/6/1890, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,203,215] Emily, d/o Edward & Frances, born 1872 & died 17/7/1952, Hamilton, NSW.[163,203,215]

Children of Robert Samuel Irwin & Emily Mary Ann Curr:

i.
 
Orbury Lyall Irwin, born 1890, Dungog, NSW.[15,215] Died 28/8/1972, Muswellbrook, NSW.[163,203,215] Did not marry.[163]

ii.

Ida Olive Irwin, born 1892, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Died 1969, Hamilton, NSW.[163] Married Oswald Clyde Osborn, 18/11/1914, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15,203,215] Oswald, s/o William & Eliza, died 1962, Hamilton, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Athol Irwin Osborn, born 1915, Goulburn, NSW.[15] Married Muriel Doris Crockett, 1941, Hamilton, NSW.[15]
(b)
Hilton Clyde Osborn, born 1917, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15] Married Joan Theresa Mary Griffiths, 1938, Newcastle, NSW.[15]
(c)
Russell Lyall Osborn, born between 1919-1922.[163] Died 1922, West Maitland, NSW.[163]

iii.

Florence Irene Irwin, born 1894, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Hamilton Edward Perrett, 1915, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15,203,215] Hamilton, s/o Alfred & Sarah, died 1966, Newcastle, NSW.[163]
Children: (a)
 
Joyce Priscilla Perrett, born 1916, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15] Married Leslie Ernest Lound, 1940, Merewether, NSW.[15]

iv.

Douglas Norman Irwin, born 1899, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Died 1971, Newcastle, NSW.[163] Married Annie Cross, 1931, Murrurundi, NSW.[15,203,215]

v.

Robert Lyall Irwin, born 1903, Dungog, NSW.[15,203,215] Married Elma A. Suters, 1926, Port Macquarie, NSW.[15,203,215] No further record.

vi.
Beryl Florence Irwin, born 1909, Raymond Terrace, NSW.[15,203,215] Married William R. Gray, 1932, Hamiliton, NSW.[15,203,215] No further record.




1.1.1.5.2. Thomas Gray Irwin, born 17/12/1884, Dungog, NSW.[4,10,15,187,188,192,203,215,398] Birth registered 29/1/1885, Robert Irwin, father, the informant.[4] Witnesses were Mrs Atkins & Mrs Smith.[4] Died 1/9/1952,[4,10,163,203,215] Newcastle, NSW.[163] Fettler, 1912.[4] Part-time farmer, aquired a property on Koorainhat Creek, Manning district, NSW.[4] Married Florence Amelia Green,[4,209] 24/8/1912, Presbyterian Church, West Maitland, NSW.[4,10,15,189,203] Marriage was performed by Rev. Adam McCook at the church manse.[4] Both resided East Maitland at the time of their marriage & were previously unmarried.[4] Witnesses were May Webb & Jessie McCook.[4] Florence, d/o Charles & Ann, born 11/3/1876, East Maitland, NSW,[191,203] and died 29/9/1919 (43yo),[4,163,203] Raymond Terrace, Newcastle, NSW.[163,203] Florence was a dress maker.[4] Florence's obituary, published 3/10/1919, reads: "The death occured in Newcastle Hospital on Tuesday morning of Mrs T Irwin of Kinross Raymond Terrace. The deaceased lady had been suffering indifferent health for some time. She leaves a husband and one son. The deceased lady was highly respected by those who knew her, and her death is much regretted by them. The remains were interred in the Methodist Cemetery at East Maitland on Wednesday."[209] Married 2nd Anne Laura Josephine Gorton,[4] 4/4/1923, Auburn, Sydney, NSW.[10,15,203,215] Anne born 12/3/1892, Glen William, NSW, died 29/6/1980, Kempsey, NSW,[4,10,203,215,223] & buried St Thomas Anglican, Glen William, NSW.[223] 

Children of Thomas Gray Irwin & Florence Green:

i.
 
Robert Charles Irwin, born 9/10/1913, Morpeth Road, East Maitland, NSW.[4,15,203] Died 13/5/1993,[4,203] John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton, NSW, as a result of injuries caused by a car crash at Dungog, NSW.[4] He was cremated and his ashes interred partially in the Green family vault, East Maitland, NSW, and partially with his mother at the Presbyterian Cemetery, East Maitland, NSW.[4] Mechanic in the RAAF during WWII.[4] Enlisted 19/6/1941 & was discharged 4/3/1946.[4] During the war he worked on the airplane "G for George", which is now in the Canberra War Memorial.[4] After the was a motor mechanic and then sold cars & motor bikes.[4] Founded the 'Reliance Motor Company', selling Massey Ferguson tractors & farm machinery, which passed into his sons' hands when he retired.[4] Married Alice May Ernst, 1/1932, Dungog, NSW.[4,15,185,203] Alice, d/o Joseph & Aliston, born 3/1/1916, Dungog, NSW & died 18/3/1982,[4,203] Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW,[4] & buried Church of England Section, Allotment 447, Section A11, Dungog Cemetery, Dungog, NSW.[4,185] Cause of death was cancer.[4] Resided 1949-1993, No.50 Hooke Street, Dungog, NSW.[4]
Children: (a)
 
Florence Amelia Irwin, born 19/4/1932, Dungog, NSW.[4,203] Married Kenneth John Simmons, 22/12/1951, Dungog, NSW.[163,203] Kenneth born 14/4/1928, Dungog, NSW.[203]
(b)
John Graham Irwin, born 13/1/1937, Dungog, NSW.[4,203]
(c)
Barry Irwin, born  19/1/1940, Dungog, NSW.[4,203] Married Ena Rose Davey, 1961, Dungog, NSW.[203] Ena, d/o Timothy & Mertyl, born 26/8/1939, Stroud, NSW & died 3/4/1962, Hamilton, NSW.[163,203] Married 2nd Beverly Irene Bacon, 1964, Dungog, NSW.[203] Beverly born 1946, Dungog, NSW.[203]

Children of Thomas Gray Irwin & Anne Laura Josephine Gorton:

i.
 
George Thomas Gorton Irwin,[10] born 22/4/1926, Hamilton, NSW.[4,203,215,223] Died 12/11/1995, Sydney, NSW,[4,203,215,223] & buried 15/11/1995, St Thomas Anglican, Glen William, NSW.[4,223] Anglican priest.[4,10,223] Did not marry.[203]

ii.

Ruby Josephine Irwin,[163] born 30/8/1929, Dungog Hospital, Dungog, NSW.[4,203,215] Married Keith Raymond Ryde,[203,215] 1956, Port Macquarie, NSW.[163] Keith born 13/6/1929, Condobolin, NSW.[4,203,215]

     
Thomas Gray Irwin
Thomas Gray Irwin
Image - Vicki Simmons
Robert, Florence & George Irwin
Robert, Florence & George Irwin
Image - Vicki Simmons
Children of John & Jane Irwin
Robert Charles Irwin
Image - Vicki Simmons
Ruby Irwin, January 1941
Ruby Irwin, 1941
Image - David Powell
     
Scots' Presbyterian Church, West Maitland
Scots' Presbyterian Church, West Maitland
Image - Organ Historical Trust
Glen William Anglican Cemetery
Glen William Anglican Cemetery
Image Ruth King, Aust. Cemetery Index
Kinross estate, Raymond Terrace
Kinross estate, Raymond Terrace
Image Google Streetview
   
Scots' Presbyterian Church, West Maitland: West Maitland was the cradle of Presbyterianism in the Hunter region. In 1849 the church and the adjoining high school and manse were erected. The church, which is built in rendered brick in the Romanesque style, incorporates a tower over the entrance capped by a pyramidal roof and a nave of five bays. The church was originally part of the “Free Presbyterian” branch of the denomination and no musical instruments, nor hymns, were admitted in worship. In 1865 the church joined the larger Presbyterian Church of New South Wales.[Organ Historical Trust] Kinross is a farming & grazing estate, 68 Wahroonga Street, Raymond Terrace. The sandstone house was built in the late 1830's, is constructed of Muree sandstone with a roof of slate. The main house forms the centre of a U-shaped group, the service wings enclosing a large courtyard at the rear. The slope of the ground enabled the inclusion of large cellars beneath the building. It is one of the original estates in the area from Hexham to Raymond Terrace. Scotsman George Graham with his brother James, a superintendent for the AA Company came to NSW in the mid 1820's. George received 640 acres fronting the Hunter River south of the government reserve. He quickly cultivated his land. AA Company personnel travelling to Maitland and Newcastle would frequently call at Kinross where Graham's boat was used to cross the river. As a result, tracks were established between Port Stephens and Raymond Terrace and the river junction became and accepted crossing place. George Graham sold Kinross after eight years there and moved to Sydney. In 1839 Archibald Windeyer, uncle of Richard acquired Kinross. He also purchased 1700 acres adjoining. He also had land in the Upper Williams and squatting runs in the New England. He resided principally on Kinross as did descendants for several generations. Kinross adjoins the town of Raymond Terrace and so was subject in the 20th century to the encroachment of the town. Kinross was built of Muree sandstone quarried from a stone quarry in Raymond Terrace.[Heritage NSW] {Note that John Irwin, the progenitor of this Irwin family, purchased his Tillegra estate off Archibald Windeyer's brother}

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